Alexandra Shields

Alexandra Shields

A playwright hailing originally from California and currently located in Chicago, Illinois. Alexandra is a Northwestern graduate who participated in the Theater for Young Audiences and Playwriting modules. Alexandra is the Co-Artistic Director and founding member of Aegis Theatre, focused on cultivating an environment of respect in the theatrical profession, and providing an artistic home for artists in all...
A playwright hailing originally from California and currently located in Chicago, Illinois. Alexandra is a Northwestern graduate who participated in the Theater for Young Audiences and Playwriting modules. Alexandra is the Co-Artistic Director and founding member of Aegis Theatre, focused on cultivating an environment of respect in the theatrical profession, and providing an artistic home for artists in all stages of their career. In 2017, Alexandra was commissioned by Mudlark Theater to write Twelve, an adaptation of The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Twelve went on to win the Jackie White Memorial National Playwriting Competition. Alexandra has had two ten minute pieces produced in 13th Street Rep.'s 10 Minute Play Festival, two sketches with Outside The Box, and four sketches with Second City's Mary Scruggs Festival. Alexandra has published articles with Cracked.com and The Second City Network. In 2015, she produced a work that she cowrite with Bex Ehrmann, Charred, in Jackalope Theater Company's Frontier Theater. In her spare time, Alexandra writes a weekly Survivor (the tv show) blog called Hot or Not, focusing on the skill of each player's gameplay, with her boyfriend, Gus.

Plays

  • Dread
    The hook-handed man. The murdered roommate. The girl who has been dead twenty-five years. Everyone knows those classic scary stories... but why do we love them so much? Alexandra Shields' new play Dread is a creepy journey through our contemporary horror mythos.
  • Route
    In Route, a dysfunctional family endures an agonizing car ride on California's i280 after an explosive sex scandal at their Catholic school. Scarlet, the eldest sister, aged twenty, and recently orphaned, finds herself the guardian to her two precocious sisters. As the family struggles with a mounting debt, Scarlet's only solace is that her sisters' futures are all but assured thanks to...
    In Route, a dysfunctional family endures an agonizing car ride on California's i280 after an explosive sex scandal at their Catholic school. Scarlet, the eldest sister, aged twenty, and recently orphaned, finds herself the guardian to her two precocious sisters. As the family struggles with a mounting debt, Scarlet's only solace is that her sisters' futures are all but assured thanks to scholarships they've obtained to attend a prestigious prep school in Atherton. However, Jade, the sixteen year old middle child, has put her future at risk by engaging in a sex activities with a boy at her school in the teacher's lounge. Scarlet attempts to uncover the true reason why Jade would flippantly throw away her future, all while hiding a scandalous secret of her own. As her two elder sisters quarrel, nine year old Georgia, tries desperately to keep the peace. In the long car ride home, Georgia discovers much more than she bargained for about sex and the sisters she thought she knew. In one explosive journey home, no topic is off the table: feminism, sisterhood, politics, internalized misogyny, internet culture, religion, and sex education. Route cheekily explores how we physically and metaphorically crash into one another.

    Note: Georgia can be played by an adult actress.
  • Twelve
    "What is your freedom worth?" In Twelve, Alexandra Shields concocts a twisted dark comedy replete with talking heads, Democracy, and a dash of punk rock. This young audiences/young voices tale is a feminist reimagining of the fairytale classic: The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Twelve sisters find themselves imprisoned by their despot father, King Augustus, but they escape each night with the help of...
    "What is your freedom worth?" In Twelve, Alexandra Shields concocts a twisted dark comedy replete with talking heads, Democracy, and a dash of punk rock. This young audiences/young voices tale is a feminist reimagining of the fairytale classic: The Twelve Dancing Princesses. Twelve sisters find themselves imprisoned by their despot father, King Augustus, but they escape each night with the help of the king's steward, Humphrey, and a mysterious figure only known as The Old Crone. The king issues a decree that if any young suitor can discover how the princesses are escaping, they will be able to pick any of his daughters to be their wife. Should they fail, they will be executed. When this decree ultimately threatens Humphrey's life, the princesses must face the ultimate cost of their freedom, and tackle the mounting divisions in their own ranks. Will the girls give up their freedom to save the life of a friend? What are the true motivations of the enigmatic Old Crone? And where have the princesses been going at night?