Christine Stoddard

Christine Stoddard

Christine Sloan Stoddard is a Salvadoran-American writer, director, actor, and artist. She is the author of the critically acclaimed play "Mi Abuela, Queen of Nightmares," as well as several books, including Water for the Cactus Woman and Heaven Is a Photograph, among others. Her short story collection, Desert Fox by the Sea, won the Four Chambers Press prize in fiction and was published by the now-...
Christine Sloan Stoddard is a Salvadoran-American writer, director, actor, and artist. She is the author of the critically acclaimed play "Mi Abuela, Queen of Nightmares," as well as several books, including Water for the Cactus Woman and Heaven Is a Photograph, among others. Her short story collection, Desert Fox by the Sea, won the Four Chambers Press prize in fiction and was published by the now-defunct Hoot ‘n’ Waddle in Phoenix, Arizona in 2019. The director of several films, she made the arthouse title, Sirena’s Gallery, her first feature. Her words and images have appeared in The Huffington Post, Cosmopolitan, Bustle, Ms. Magazine, The Feminist Wire, Marie Claire, Visible Poetry Project, Digital America, Yes! Magazine, and beyond. She has presented work at the Queens Botanical Garden, Theatre Row, the Elisabet Ney Museum, the Abrons Arts Center, the Broadway Comedy Club, and elsewhere. Stoddard was born to a Salvadoran mother and an American father in Arlington, Virginia and is the oldest of three siblings. A graduate of VCUarts and The City College of New York, she lives in Brooklyn, NY, where she runs Quail Bell Press & Productions. She is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America, the Authors Guild, and the Actors' Equity Association.

Plays

  • Mi Abuela, Queen of Nightmares
    Maya, a young Salvadoran-American woman, navigates trauma and family mythology through magic and folklore as she comes of age in Phoenix, Arizona. Her story explores mother-daughter relationships, mixed race identity, being the first-generation child of an immigrant, growing up without a father, and fantasy as a coping mechanism, while featuring movement and dance. And there are owls, jaguars, and cacti—oh, my...
    Maya, a young Salvadoran-American woman, navigates trauma and family mythology through magic and folklore as she comes of age in Phoenix, Arizona. Her story explores mother-daughter relationships, mixed race identity, being the first-generation child of an immigrant, growing up without a father, and fantasy as a coping mechanism, while featuring movement and dance. And there are owls, jaguars, and cacti—oh, my! *Trigger warning: This play references sexual assault and suicide.
  • Hashtag Mountain Girl
    A comedy play about social media influencers at a mountain lodge, cam girls at Area 51, and more.
  • Skink
    Miranda and Mario flee El Salvador because of their homeland's gang violence, leaving their children to be raised by their grandparents until they can send for them. When the gangs kill their children, they mourn the loss, with Miranda befriending a small lizard on their patio in Virginia. How will their lives change when Miranda gets pregnant again?
  • Cyber Cinderella
    A comedy play about Cinderella in the Digital Age.
  • My Favorite Sex Toy
    A conversation between a woman and her sex toy.
  • Clowns & Otters
    An unlikely meeting between a clown and an otter ensues. Clowns DO have sex and did you know that otters have a thing for baby seals? But besides their perverted sides, they share their philosophies and approaches to fun and play. A clown pimp and a couple of shock jocks also make appearances, but we won't spoil it.
  • Forget Fairytales
    A carriage wreck of a comedy play...er, enchanted variety show led by fairies? Whether magic is real may be up for debate, but the fairy twerking in this bewitching show is very real. Based upon the "Forget Fairytales" comics series created by the playwright (www.forgetfairytalescomics.com).