Aurin Squire

Aurin Squire

Aurin Squire is an award-winning playwright, journalist, and multimedia artist. In 2015 he graduated from The Juilliard School after a two-year fellowship in the the Lila Acheson American Playwriting Program. He is a two-time recipient of the 2014 Lecomte du Nouy Prize from Lincoln. In 2014-2015, he has fellowships at The Dramatists Guild of America, National Black Theatre, and Brooklyn Arts Exchange. Squire...
Aurin Squire is an award-winning playwright, journalist, and multimedia artist. In 2015 he graduated from The Juilliard School after a two-year fellowship in the the Lila Acheson American Playwriting Program. He is a two-time recipient of the 2014 Lecomte du Nouy Prize from Lincoln. In 2014-2015, he has fellowships at The Dramatists Guild of America, National Black Theatre, and Brooklyn Arts Exchange. Squire's play "Defacing Michael Jackson" was the winner of the 2014 Act One Writing Contest at Lincoln Center Theatre and the one-act version of the play has been published by Samuel French. After graduating with honors from Northwestern University, he worked as a reporter for publications like ESPN, The Miami Herald, and Chicago Tribune. His dark comedy "To Whom It May Concern" won New York LGBT theatre awards for best play, best playwright, and best actor before being optioned and remounted off-broadway to critical acclaim at the Arclight Theatre. As a documentary writer, Squire received a year-long commission to live in New Mexico, interviewing Jewish Latinos. He worked with an ensemble to create A Light in My Soul, a docudrama produced around New Mexico about Jewish families who fled from the Spanish Inquisition and settled in the American southwest. Squire also wrote "Dreams of Freedom," the multimedia installation video about Jewish immigrants in the 20th century for the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia. "Dreams" won 3 national museum awards and is in the permanent exhibit at NMAJH. In 2013 his drama "Freefalling" was produced at Barrington Stage Company and won the 2013 Fiat Lux Award ("Let There Be Light") from the Catholic Church’s Theatre Conference. In 2014 Squire won the grand prize in the InspiraTO Theatre’s International Play Festival in Toronto (largest theatre festival in Canada) for "Freefalling" and the play was published in Dramatists Play Service’s Outstanding Short Plays Volume 2. "Article 119-1," his drama about a gay rights activist in Belarus, was produced in Florence, Italy, Norway, Vancouver, and Los Angeles in March 2014. Squire’s comedy "African Americana" received its world premiere at London’s Theatre 503 in June 2014. He has been a guest artist and lecturer at Gettysburg College, Malloy College, and New School University. His plays have been produced at venues like Abingdon Theatre, ArcLight Theatre, Ars Nova, Barrington Stage Company, Brooklyn Arts Exchange (BAX), Cherry Lane, Lincoln Center Lab, National Hispanic Cultural Center. Squire works as a video writer/producer for media organizations like Learn Liberty. He has also worked as a journalist at publications like The New Republic, Talking Points Memo, and Take Part. Squire works as a staff writer for the new CBS political satire "BrainDead" which is a summer series set to premiere in June. He lives in New York City.

Plays

  • African Americana
    A young political campaign worker hits the road and has to survive a series of traffic stops. "African Americana" workshopped at Brooklyn Arts Exchange in a Occupy to Obama Festival, before receiving a full production at Theatre 503 in London.
  • Mississippi Goddamn
    An elderly couple reflect on the spate of police brutality cases while rediscovering the classic Nina Simone protest song, "Mississippi Goddamn."
  • Freefalling
    Two passengers and a stewardess on a falling plane give a moment-by-moment account of what happens when tomorrow is no longer certain. Winner of the 2013 Fiat Lux Award from the Catholic Church and 1st Prize in the InspiraTO Theatre's International Play Festival in Toronto.
  • A Family Manual for Kwanzaa
    When holiday family dysfunction explodes, so does a world of traditional ethnic, social traditions. "A Family Manual for Kwanzaa" is a surreal and comic look at the disintegration of a family over the seven days holiday. This is a weird, dark comedy about my family, black history, and that strange step-sister of a holiday right after Christmas that we know as Kwanzaa.
  • Running on Fire
    A young college student is out for a jog when he is implicated in a crime spree. After his property is confiscated by an officer, his attempt to seek justice sets off a chain reaction of events that ripple across the college, surrounding town, and amongst a community seething with tension. What is real and what is not get called into question in this timely play that asks 'who are we to ourselves and each...
    A young college student is out for a jog when he is implicated in a crime spree. After his property is confiscated by an officer, his attempt to seek justice sets off a chain reaction of events that ripple across the college, surrounding town, and amongst a community seething with tension. What is real and what is not get called into question in this timely play that asks 'who are we to ourselves and each other?'
  • Beasts
    When a tent city of homeless people are given a 3-day eviction notice by the government, they must scramble to find a way to escape the encroaching bulldozers that will destroy their encampment. The setting is Palo, Alto, California. But really the location could be many cities throughout the America with homeless encampments on the outskirts. This tent city is affectionately referred to as ‘Camp Hell.’...
    When a tent city of homeless people are given a 3-day eviction notice by the government, they must scramble to find a way to escape the encroaching bulldozers that will destroy their encampment. The setting is Palo, Alto, California. But really the location could be many cities throughout the America with homeless encampments on the outskirts. This tent city is affectionately referred to as ‘Camp Hell.’ Although this work is fiction, the scenario presented is a common occurrence. The criminalization of urban homelessness has scared many people into woods, abandoned lots, and parks. Once situated away from the public eye, instinct kicks in: communities are formed, relationships blossom, a daily routine establishes itself. The tone of this story shouldn’t be too heavy or tragically dark. These are vibrant, and complex people who have pieced together a life. There is humor and vitality amidst the hunger,loss, and betrayal.
  • Boxing the Sun
    “Boxing the Sun” is a full-length drama of interwoven stories about Chicagoans fighting to make it through the unbearable heat and another day in the urban jungle. Set on the hottest day of the year, the lives of friends, families and neighbors spark off each other to comic and tragic results. The story takes place on a Chicago block, mostly in and outside a small apartment complex, but it could really be...
    “Boxing the Sun” is a full-length drama of interwoven stories about Chicagoans fighting to make it through the unbearable heat and another day in the urban jungle. Set on the hottest day of the year, the lives of friends, families and neighbors spark off each other to comic and tragic results. The story takes place on a Chicago block, mostly in and outside a small apartment complex, but it could really be set in any urban landscape. Due to the fluidity of the interweaving stories, the set should be sparse and flexible.
  • To Whom It May Concern
    *BEST PLAY, BEST WRITING, BEST ACTOR AWARDS in the LGBT Theatre Festival, Fresh Fruit* To Whom It May Concern is an epistolary play about a 15-year-old boy who tries to seduce a military soldier in Afghanistan through a series of letters and online encounters When Lorenzo pretends to be a young woman their romance takes off until one night Maurice decides to visit his lady-in-waiting. To Whom It May Concern...
    *BEST PLAY, BEST WRITING, BEST ACTOR AWARDS in the LGBT Theatre Festival, Fresh Fruit* To Whom It May Concern is an epistolary play about a 15-year-old boy who tries to seduce a military soldier in Afghanistan through a series of letters and online encounters When Lorenzo pretends to be a young woman their romance takes off until one night Maurice decides to visit his lady-in-waiting. To Whom It May Concern is a bittersweet comedy. REVIEWS 1. NYTHEATRE All in all, To Whom It May Concern is an engaging and provocative new drama that allows us to walk in some other fellows' shoes for a couple of hours, yielding significant insights along the way. 2. Showbusiness Weekly The primary delight of the evening is the script itself. Squire brilliantly employs the epistolary device to tell a story about the perils of unconventional intimacy. The tricky device works because it is intrinsic to the plot; Lorenzo would not have been able to trick Maurice into falling for ‘him’ outside the setting of the Internet. It would have been just another missed connection. The setup is so well executed that by the time they meet face to face, the audience is enthralled.
  • Don't Smoke In Bed
    London Reviews ★★★★ The Reviews Hub ★★★★ The Upcoming ★★★★ Theatre and Performance Guide and Guru ★★★★★ Scatter of Opinion ★★★★★ Ginger Wig and Strolling Man "Don't Smoke In Bed" explodes a world in which traditional ethnic, social, economic and sexual boundaries have become so porous that people are never quite sure who or where they stand. Richard and Sheryl are an interracial...
    London Reviews ★★★★ The Reviews Hub ★★★★ The Upcoming ★★★★ Theatre and Performance Guide and Guru ★★★★★ Scatter of Opinion ★★★★★ Ginger Wig and Strolling Man "Don't Smoke In Bed" explodes a world in which traditional ethnic, social, economic and sexual boundaries have become so porous that people are never quite sure who or where they stand. Richard and Sheryl are an interracial academic couple starting a family together. Yet when they agree to a series of 'bedroom interviews' they begin to unravel their tenuous marriage. A seemingly solid structure splits into a bedroom divided as the barriers between psychological and social, sexual and political, public and private, melt and dissolve. “Thrillingly incisive…Mightily thought-provoking.” Ian Foster, There Ought To Be Clowns “Well worth a look for anyone interested in contemporary race and gender politics.” John Demmery Green, London Pub Theatre “Don’t Smoke In Bed makes important points about how uncomfortable we still are with openly discussing race, gender and domestic violence.” Breman Rajkumar, A Younger Theatre “An honest and raw exploration of the expectations and pressures imposed by society on interracial couples…Each scene is more passionate than the last. Eye-opening and troubling, Don’t Smoke in Bed will force audiences to re-evaluate their understanding of modern society.” Michelle Keepence, The Upcoming “Complex and powerful exploration of racial tension in the USA today.” Annabel Mellor, Theatre and Performance Guide and Guru “Squire absolutely nails the quandary of white liberal guilt.” Ian Foster, There Ought To Be Clowns “True moments of heartbreak and catharsis.” Ginger Wig & Strolling Man “Squire’s rich, insightful script celebrates the power of language. The intelligent, self-aware dialogue has a natural ring and yet manages to convey impressive depths of meaning.” Annabel Mellor, Theatre and Performance Guide and Guru “Aurin Squire writes an insightful analysis of a modern day couple with age-old problems.” Daniel Perks, The Reviews Hub “The play is rich in themes of historic, racial, gendered, and cultural conflict.” John Demmery Green, London Pub Theatre
  • Defacing Michael Jackson
    *2014 Winner of Lincoln Center's Act One Prize* Set among the swamps and canals of rural Florida, Defacing Michael Jackson follows a motley group of African-American teenagers who create their own Michael Jackson fan club in 1984. But when a Caucasian boy moves to the neighborhood and tries to join the club, all the rules of the community are challenged and changed. Defacing Michael Jackson is a satire...
    *2014 Winner of Lincoln Center's Act One Prize* Set among the swamps and canals of rural Florida, Defacing Michael Jackson follows a motley group of African-American teenagers who create their own Michael Jackson fan club in 1984. But when a Caucasian boy moves to the neighborhood and tries to join the club, all the rules of the community are challenged and changed. Defacing Michael Jackson is a satire about the do's and don'ts of Blackness, hero worship, and American identity.
  • Obama-ology
    London Reviews ★★★★ London Review Hub ★★★★ Everything Theatre (UK) Warren is a fresh-faced, new wave, thoroughly modern, hot-wired, wifi'ed, ecologically green, politically progressive, on-point staffer for the 2008 Obama campaign. When he agrees to some on-the-job training from a chorus of campaign instructors, the questions he faces out in the field begin to unravel his education in the classroom....
    London Reviews ★★★★ London Review Hub ★★★★ Everything Theatre (UK) Warren is a fresh-faced, new wave, thoroughly modern, hot-wired, wifi'ed, ecologically green, politically progressive, on-point staffer for the 2008 Obama campaign. When he agrees to some on-the-job training from a chorus of campaign instructors, the questions he faces out in the field begin to unravel his education in the classroom. As his job requirements and his personal beliefs split apart, the barriers between political and cultural, psychological and social, racial and religious, public and private begin to dissolve. "Obama-ology" is a 21st century tale about what happens when the traditional ethnic, social, economic, and party boundaries have become so porous that people are never quite sure with whom or where they stand. All that and it's a comedy too! Other Reviews 1. The Public Review ★★★★ "a fast flowing production in which comedy, suspense and high emotion are delivered with equal confidence. In all respects, this production is in tune with Squire’s smart and incisive dialogue." 2. The Guardian ★★★ "really entertaining evening" and "entertaining political satire" 3. Everything Theatre “An exuberant, entertaining, engaging, emotional and amusing performance!” 4. British Theatre Guide "A resounding success thanks to a lively script that leavens the serious issues with apt humour, a series of gripping episodes and the efforts of a well-drilled and more than capable cast." 5. Review Gate “See this play. This production. Both are miraculous. The whole piece, so vividly played, might hopefully retain the American Dream. But it does so with a wide-awake sense of reality.” 6. One World “You leave the theatre entertained and provoked, remembering – if ruefully – that moment in history when those who were there could say with conviction, “Change is possible … I saw the proof.” 7. UK Theatre Network “Aurin Squire has written a satire with substance - a play that should not be missed.”