Samantha Noble

Samantha Noble

Samantha Noble is a Boston-based playwright and theatre artist. She attended Smith College, where she was awarded the Denis Johnston Playwriting Prize. While at Smith, she acted as a Research Fellow in the joint faculty and student Louise W. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute’s project titled “Evil”, for which her year-long she developed and staged her play "The Strength of Stones". In 2013,...
Samantha Noble is a Boston-based playwright and theatre artist. She attended Smith College, where she was awarded the Denis Johnston Playwriting Prize. While at Smith, she acted as a Research Fellow in the joint faculty and student Louise W. and Edmund J. Kahn Liberal Arts Institute’s project titled “Evil”, for which her year-long she developed and staged her play "The Strength of Stones". In 2013, she partnered with director Kathryn Stewart to create a Seattle-based theatre project, The Tenacity Theatre Collective, through which she premiered her original work "An Actress vs. William Shakespeare" as part of Seattle’s Arts Crush Festival. The play came to the East Coast as part of the Hamilton & Wenham Art Grows Here Festival. She worked with New Century Theatre in all aspects of theatrical production from 2008-2011. Her play "A Drink" was sponsored by The Nora Theatre Company in the 2016 Boston Theatre Marathon. In summer of 2016, her newest play, "Franklin", was developed as part of the Kennedy Center and National New Play Network’s MFA Playwrights’ Workshop. She has worked as a dramaturge developing new works through Boston University and Boston Playwright’s Theatre, and has taught Creative Writing at Boston University.

Plays

  • Franklin
    The play charts the course of the ill-fated Franklin expedition from their departure from England in 1845 to the rediscovery of one of their lost ships in 2014. What began as an attempt to find the Northwest Passage ended as a disaster that claimed the lives of 129 men including Captain Sir John Franklin. But how these men actually died and what they experienced in those final days trapped in the ice remains a...
    The play charts the course of the ill-fated Franklin expedition from their departure from England in 1845 to the rediscovery of one of their lost ships in 2014. What began as an attempt to find the Northwest Passage ended as a disaster that claimed the lives of 129 men including Captain Sir John Franklin. But how these men actually died and what they experienced in those final days trapped in the ice remains a mystery. Early letters home offer tantalizing hints to who these men were when they left England, and Inuit myths shed a frightening light on what they might have become by the time they died. Were they driven mad by lead poisoning, contracted from the canned goods that were supposed to sustain them? Did isolation and terror break them long before lead poisoning could, as their projected one year stretched into three with no sign of escape? When the inevitable madness came, how did the crew survive as their shipmates became monsters? And most importantly, when the madness closed in on them, did they have any hope? Hope is what holds together the lives of the four crew members whose lives we follow throughout the play as they struggle through increasing chaos to survive. As their expedition collapses around them, they cling to the last hope of rescue and the possibility of escape. Hope also drives the modern explorers who seek those lost sailors in the present. The play juxtaposes the story of the Franklin Expedition with that of a passionate young researcher determined to find the final resting place of its ships. On the last of her grant money, she faces her own struggle on the ice to track down the ships before she loses her chance forever. The members of her crew are rapidly losing faith, and her only female companion, a young musician, seems to be a money-grubbing detriment. But each woman might hold the key the other needs to discover the truth. Weaving together the loss of these two ships and the quest to rediscover them, the play explores the human longing for adventure and the consequences of that longing. It tests the limits of what people will do to achieve their passions, and the combination of bravery and hubris it takes to truly achieve something truly great.
  • A Drink
    Nora sits down with her mother, Willa, over a couple of glasses of Jack Daniels. She has some news: Willa’s theory of parallel universes is finally on the cusp of being proven. Suddenly anything is possible, and this new discovery has given Nora the strength to finally give her mother what she asked for years ago.