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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Lainie Vansant:
    16 Feb. 2021
    The moral ambiguity in this play is fascinating - while you can't condone the characters' behavior, their flaws make them interesting, and Romeo does a great job not letting you write them off completely. It's a beautiful Alzheimer's play and a mid-life crisis play with some beautiful imagery to boot. Check it out!
  • Ross Tedford Kendall:
    20 Sep. 2020
    A simple story, yet brimming with emotion. Every character has a relatable point of view, and the decisions they make, good or bad, are ones we may make if thrust into the situation. This play really explores the human element in its subjects. Highly recommended.
  • Ruth Cooper:
    11 Sep. 2020
    This play made me cry. Lia Romeo profoundly captures desperation and loneliness. It has been a long time since reading a play (or reading anything at all) has triggered such visceral sense memory. Beautiful imagery and endless heart.
  • Nick Malakhow:
    15 Jan. 2020
    A quirky, offbeat, often times hilarious, and human story told with an extraordinarily deft hand, Romeo explores caretaking of various forms and its impacts. The four characters in this piece are vibrantly rendered and nuanced--though they oftentimes skirt around saying what they directly mean, their intentions, actions, and reactions are crystal clear and completely plausible. It is a testament to the writing that, even when the characters do and say eyebrow-raising things, the actions come from a truthful and compelling to watch place. Lastly, the theatrical world crafted here blends sharp realism with just enough whimsy and lyricism. Gorgeous!
  • Grant MacDermott:
    13 Jan. 2020
    One of the most beautifully, elegantly, and effortlessly crafted plays I've read in a while. A quintessential Romeo play but with an extra layer of poetry and heart that made me catch my breath, laugh out loud, and wipe a tear away more than once. An achingly human play that doesn't give you any answers just more questions and yet at the end you find yourself comforted and as if you have truly learned something. And as a man who lost his father to Alzheimer's, Romeo does an impeccable job of capturing the disease with accuracy and understanding. Well done.
  • Aleks Merilo:
    7 Aug. 2019
    A totally unique theatrical venture that manages to blur the line between what is relatable and what is fantastical. The at times heavy content is fused with offbeat wit and whimsey, with priceless dialogue along the way ("I actually used to cry in the grocery store all the time."). The imagery makes this play feel like a painting that has come alive. What I like the most is that Romeo respects the intelligence of the audience enough to present us with symbolism without spelling out hammering us over the head with its meaning. I always enjoy her work.
  • Abraham Johnson:
    1 Apr. 2019
    I read this play a week ago and the images still feel totally vivid. Lots of retina-burn in this script. It's beautiful and tragic and messy and fun and awkward and just a lovely play. Finishing the last scene made me call my mom. Really, really love this!
  • Unicorn Theatre:
    28 Mar. 2019
    This play was a SEMIFINALIST for the 2019-2020 In-Progress New Play Reading Series at Unicorn Theatre in Kansas City, Missouri. It is our pleasure to support THE FOREST.
  • Tyler Dwiggins:
    15 Nov. 2018
    The Forest is a deeply empathetic dramedy about loss. Despite dealing with heavy topics like dementia and divorce, the writing never loses its natural buoyancy or humor. Lia Romeo has an immense gift for crafting complicated characters and for consistently shifting the power dynamics of their relationships. Crackling with humanity, The Forest is a beautiful play about a mother and daughter struggling to stay rooted to the ground.
  • Sarah Tuft:
    12 May. 2018
    Like its namesake, THE FOREST grows quietly and imperceptibly into a powerful immovable force that examines the interdependence of life and the ties that bind. Its characters-- Juliet, Pam, Miguel and Andrew-- each seek the light in their own tangle of branches and brush, occasionally coming together for a moment in the sun. I found this play to be an exceptionally empathetic and perceptive about what it is to be in another’s shoes. THE FOREST is a story about mothers and daughters, about the mistakes we all make, about dreams lost or deferred and most of all, about love.

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