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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • C. Meaker:
    5 Jun. 2023
    This play confronts college theater (and the professional environment we're asking students to participate in) by looking at fat body politics in action and the ways in which we ask fat bodies to be smaller. But it doesn't just wallow in sadness like a lot of our media. No, it's funny and dark and honest, and gives every character so much to do, allowing everyone to examine how we all participate in fatphobia. It's a play I wish had existed when I was in undergrad.
  • Shara Feit:
    4 Jun. 2023
    Y'all, this PLAY. I attended a reading of the play at The Lanford Wilson Festival, a festival of new plays for college-aged actors, and it absolutely brought down the house. It's funny and full of heart and deeply relatable and bold, full of non-normative body virtuosity.
  • Jessica Moss:
    3 Jun. 2023
    All the tiny terrors that haunt rehearsal halls and conversations around bodies in performance are so truthfully presented in a play that also manages to be funny and angry and nuanced. I saw this with a group of college-age actors and the way related to the piece was palpable. If you work with young actors, you very likely have some who need this play, the opportunities it presents, and what it is saying. Great scenes, great monologues, great moments, great roles for women.... great play.
  • Jacquelyn Floyd-Priskorn:
    3 Sep. 2021
    This sent me right back to my college theatre days. Sarah is perceived to be so strong because she merely exists how she is, so people feel they can say and do anything around her and she will "handle" it. This story is so real and relatable. I hope someone can film this so that it can be played at the start of every semester in the theatre departments! We should all proudly occupy our space!
  • Emma Goldman-Sherman:
    28 Aug. 2021
    First I love the body positivity! Power Play does not shy away from the brutal realities of the dark side of the theatre and would make for some very cringey (in a good way) revelations onstage in performance. The relentlessness of the oppression builds beautifully. The male privilege on display is undeniable and so real. And the play earns its glorious ending. I am cheering for the future of theatre, thanks to Greene.
  • Nick Malakhow:
    27 Aug. 2021
    I loved how this piece explored the unique toxic dynamics present in theater in higher ed while also commenting on the ways they're informed by professional theater and society as a whole. The women's voices centered in this piece are nuanced and complex in their differing relationships with fatphobia and self-image, and Greene examines the ways cis-hetero-patriarchal society pits women against one another so frustratingly as obstacles to their own liberation. I love the questions Sarah asks both the other people in the piece and the world as a whole. Her powerhouse of a monologue is stunning.
  • Shaun Leisher:
    26 Aug. 2021
    I needed to take a deep breath after reading this play. Greene pours her soul into this play that and has written something that will start much needed conversation and hopefully make change. Great theatre should speak truth to power and this play is telling so many truths that powerful people in the theatre industry and in the educational sector must hear and reflect on. People are being failed and actively harmed by this industry and the educators that are trying to "tell it like it is." This play needs to be produced everywhere.