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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Paul Smith:
    6 Jun. 2021
    This powerful and insightful play gives the audience a wealth of questions to ponder and thoughts to filter. Craig Houk's writing is seemingly effortless in it's ability to reach into every corner of each character. A memorable and dynamic piece of story-telling which will stay in the mind long after the curtain has fallen.
  • Donald E. Baker:
    30 Apr. 2021
    Too many people interpret "made in God's image" as "God hates the same people we do." Almost half a century later there are still parents who reject their children, believing that is what God would have them do, and children who are forced to separate themselves from those who should love them. Craig Houk explores these family dynamics in a dramatic and relatable way that will prompt audiences to reconsider their own relationships. The play reads well and would be impactful on stage. Highly recommended.
  • David Hansen:
    22 Apr. 2021
    How the parents either do or do not come to terms with who their children are is at the root of this tale. Living in a more accepting place and time, it is difficult to imagine the kind of murderous hatred people can feel, even toward their own children. Each parent self-defines as Christian, though each has a different idea of exactly what that means. This is a devastating, often ugly, and ultimately hopeful expression of love, faith, family, and acceptance. Highly recommended!
  • Doug DeVita:
    21 Apr. 2021
    I know every single person here, including those who do not appear on stage. I knew them in 1973, I knew them in 1997, and I even know some of them now. And that is one of the greatest strengths of Houk’s cautionary work: although the play takes place in the early 1970s, the Beverlys, the Helens, the Beaus… they all still exist and the fight for acceptance is still raging on, whether the battleground is the family kitchen or the public arena. Thank you, Craig, for continuing to shine your light where it needs to be shone.
  • John Mabey:
    13 Apr. 2021
    The world created in this play is nearly 50 years ago and yet so relevant and important for today. In SYD, Craig Houk presents two Southern families navigating gender roles, sexuality and faith while also showing the tragedy of lives lost in different ways. Craig writes with such depth and naturalism where the lines instantly play out in my head while reading. And the rhythms of dialogue punctuate each character so well. This is a play I'd greatly enjoy watching on stage and a delight for performers, too, with its many surprises.
  • Philip Middleton Williams:
    8 Apr. 2021
    One of the many powerful elements of this atmospheric and haunting play is the tenuous bonds parents have with their children becoming their own person, away from the life that the parents envisioned them. In Craig Houk's skillful hands we see two families deal with their gay children in very different ways, made even more intense by tragedy and recrimination. The moments between a father struggling to understand his daughter, and a mother trying to understand what God has placed before her are achingly crafted, lyrical, and genuine. I would love to see this play produced again and again.
  • Matt Cogswell:
    30 Jan. 2021
    Craig Houk sets up what seems to be two wholesome southern American families in 1973. As the play progresses, homophobic comments drive two parallel stories. Many statements lingered with me, such as a character's death being a "message from the Almighty" that his homosexual lifestyle was truly a sin. Houk shines with his exquisite monologues, whether or not we are on the side of the character, and we do hear two varied responses to children being gay. Gender role expectations are often reversed in this rich work. It is a beautiful, haunting play.