Recommended by Bruce Karp

  • Can You Hear Me Now?
    28 Sep. 2022
    Mr. Norkin has created a very funny rift on modern technology by taking us back to communication's early days - Bell, Watson and some string. We've come a long way and I hope you'll laugh as much as I did reading this play, which manages to show in a subtle and humorous way, how much a simple idea has taken over our lives. Well done!
  • THE DATING POOL, a 15-minute play for 5 women
    28 Sep. 2022
    This is an incredibly clever story about one woman's "what ifs," "don't dos", "Why did I's" and ultimately, "how do I go on from here(s)." Ms. Rose has created a conversation between various stages of the same person's life as she decides whether or not she can jump back into the pool of living. It's funny, just a tad racy and ultimately heartfelt and highly enjoyable. A great play for a community theater with multiple roles for women of many different ages. Read it!
  • Doll Hospital
    2 Sep. 2022
    If you ever wondered what dolls do when they are not with their owners, Ms. Cole has concocted a story that might be your answer. This is a play that subtly talks about abuse and attempted male domination, and in this scenario, the dolls aren't takin' it anymore. A very clever concept, well executed.
  • Last Laugh
    2 Sep. 2022
    So a playwright, possibly named after a comedian (Mr. Amsterdam), writes a touching and funny play about two comedians, uh, comics, with a surprising and moving twist. Go figure! There are some great lines and a fine buildup to a very theatrical finish. Well done, and this should find some legs on the short play circuit.
  • Seventh Inning Stretch (Ten Minute)
    2 Sep. 2022
    Max has an "it seemed like a good idea at the time" problem that goes very badly. Or, does it? Mr. Donnelly has created a realistic and funny story that's entirely plausible. How many times have we seen viral videos where guys propose and it always ends well. This time it doesn't. The video is still viral, but it could still turn out differently for Max, if he'd just come out from under the covers. Well done!
  • The Menu
    2 Sep. 2022
    This is as original an idea as it gets. Ms. Sansone Braff has devised a wonderfully thought out, if a bit macabre, method for helping an old schoolmate choose a way to die. Creepy? A little, but you'll find yourself chuckling (nervously) as you read how the story plays out. And this was inspired by a dream! Well done and would be a great addition to a short play festival.
  • The Rotary Phone
    2 Sep. 2022
    I enjoyed the trip down telephone memory lane. The premise is clever, and it might also get current generations thinking about how far we've come with basic technology. (Did you ever think you'd be taking photos with your phone?) Mr. Martineau's characters are funny, relatable and hilariously named...and, apparently, we might see baby births sponsored by large corporations in the future. Hmmm...this is a play that would be fun to see on stage.
  • 'E'Scape
    2 Sep. 2022
    Mr. Plumridge's play pokes fun at the "Shark Tank"-like programs on TV, where entrepreneurs hope to cash in on ideas that are often wacky or at least, untenable. His characters have their own original voices and a good deal of activity takes place for a short play. I enjoyed the ending and won't spoil it here, but a warning - be careful if you try out those virtual eyeglasses - it could be a bit challenging.
  • A Semicolon is a Double
    12 Aug. 2022
    Rinkel has created two finely defined young characters in this delightful and heartwarming tale of acceptance and proper grammar. (Clever use of the grammar issue, I must say.) Having been in young Drew's situation, but without the enjoyable results, I found myself getting emotional and wishing this could have happened to me, many years ago. Well-written and sweet, this should be a big hit at LGBTQIA+ play festivals.
  • Discovery 40% Proof
    12 Aug. 2022
    Warning to those of you expecting to be alive in 2099 - alcohol will be banned on Earth with all remnants blasted into space. Ms. Feeny-Williams proposes that this could actually happen, with no one attempting to restore alcohol sanity for 3,000 years! Yet, once scientists find remnants on an unspecified planet in 4937, chaos hilariously ensues in this unexpectedly zany comic piece. Read it and have a good laugh, and maybe sip an alcoholic beverage - while you still can.

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