Recommended by Philip Middleton Williams

  • One For The Chipper
    24 May. 2020
    "The Bad News Bears" meets up with the road company of "Damn Yankees," all in the spirit of diversity and actually winning a game. Adam Seidel channels all the right energy into this team of misfits and wins your heart. And why not? Who wants to see a play about a bunch of winners? This is great fun!
  • THE SNORING SONATA
    24 May. 2020
    This had a very familiar ring to it, and I smiled all the way through to the punchline. Spot-on funny, and if you've shared the situation, you know exactly what Vivian Lermond is showing us. Yay!
  • ___________ ( a monologue)
    23 May. 2020
    While I think a lot of readers could rightly see this as a lament of losing someone they thought they knew, I can also see it very much as how one might feel when one loses someone even if they were close, in love, together, and are now gone. The layers are many in these lines of poetry, and it spoke to me of something I would think, say, and pray no matter how deep the connection was. The simplest words are often the truest.
  • Disengaged Bedfellows (1 minute play)
    23 May. 2020
    This is both a play and a poem; very succinct and powerful. Just a few words and you know everything...
  • Aces Are Feverish
    23 May. 2020
    I can tell when a playwright truly has fun with his writing and this characters, and in the case of "Aces Are Feverish," Matthew Weaver has so much fun in this send-up of hard-boiled detective film-noir play that does great honor to Dashiell Hammett. This hits all the right notes in all the right places, and I can just imagine it being done by the company of the Carol Burnett Show with all the fun that would come with it. All it needs is to be staged in black and white with an Adolph Deutsch score.
  • Ben's Key
    23 May. 2020
    This fun little romp through history and time is told in such a way that you, dear Reader, despite all the modern conveniences, might be convinced that Ben's time was better than our own. This would be a great curtain-raiser for a production of "1776."
  • SACK THE QUARTERBACK
    22 May. 2020
    This is a great monologue that shows how lessons are learned in life in ways we don’t anticipate. I’m sure there are plenty of actors who would jump at the chance to do this for any festival or an audition.
  • When the Dodgers Left Brooklyn
    22 May. 2020
    Okay, as a lifelong baseball fan and old enough to (barely) remember when the Dodgers left Brooklyn, this sweet and loving play had me from the start. Bud's attempt to leave a heavenly message for his daughter is poignant and heartfelt, and you will see how important little things are to this family. It's a home run.
  • 16 HOURS: September 5, 1972
    21 May. 2020
    Theatre isn't supposed to be documentary, but "16 HOURS: September 5, 1972" has all the elements of live theatre and real life as the hours tick by during the Israeli athletes hostage crisis in Munich. This is a very well-written play that brings the audience as close to being there are you can get, with all the tension and horror of that day. For those of us who remember it, it is a sharp recollection, and for those who weren't it's an important piece of history that should not be forgotten.
  • The Death of Gingerbread
    21 May. 2020
    Rand Higbee's dry wit and subtle sense of character interaction is on full display in this short play about a mom, a daughter, and a goldfish. The deadpan humor and droll delivery that make this play funny on the surface reveal the relationship between mother and daughter to be much more complex than you first think. It's one of the many reasons I am a huge fan of Rand's plays.

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