Allyson Dwyer

Allyson Dwyer

I'm an NJ/NYC playwright who is interested in cycles, technology, navigating the world as a woman, and how being a woman and technology intersect. Sometimes I write about these things together, sometimes separate. Recent plays include The Hub (Semi-Finalist, Princess Grace), Nothing Remained But Voice And Bones (Semi-Finalist New American Voices and NAP at Normal Ave), Arrow of Time (The Brick 2022). My...
I'm an NJ/NYC playwright who is interested in cycles, technology, navigating the world as a woman, and how being a woman and technology intersect. Sometimes I write about these things together, sometimes separate. Recent plays include The Hub (Semi-Finalist, Princess Grace), Nothing Remained But Voice And Bones (Semi-Finalist New American Voices and NAP at Normal Ave), Arrow of Time (The Brick 2022). My short play, An Instant Message, is a Samuel French Off-Off-Broadway Festival finalist. I'm currently working on an audio play as part of the inaugural SoundLab at The Brick, and a 2020-2021 member of Clubbed Thumb's Early Career Writer's Group.

I received my BFA from Eugene Lang, The New School for Liberal Arts, in 2012, with a concentration in Writing, and my Playwriting MFA at Augsburg University in Minneapolis, MN, in 2018.

Plays

  • An Instant Message
    ~10 MIN PLAY~ In the age of dial-up, a New Jersey teen saves up lunch money to buy a phone card to call her boyfriend in Kansas. Their first conversation might've gone like this. Or so she remembers.
  • Nothing Remained But Voice And Bones
    In second grade, Narcissus visits overweight Mel and informs her that she is cursed to search for perfection but to never find it. Unable to grapple with this truth, she spends a lifetime letting this curse define every relationship, even those between her past selves. Only Mel can find a way to break out of a cycle of self-hatred that keeps her from realizing what is truly beautiful about her body and her existence.
  • The Hub
    In the midst of puberty, 12-year-old Marissa discovers The Hub, a chat room where a group of young losers and outcasts can do or be anything, and together escape the confines of reality. Under the alias Ami-chan, Marissa begins her first relationship with a sixteen year old gamer, but soon finds that even online, it's hard to hide who she really is. As Marissa learns to grow up in this new digital frontier...
    In the midst of puberty, 12-year-old Marissa discovers The Hub, a chat room where a group of young losers and outcasts can do or be anything, and together escape the confines of reality. Under the alias Ami-chan, Marissa begins her first relationship with a sixteen year old gamer, but soon finds that even online, it's hard to hide who she really is. As Marissa learns to grow up in this new digital frontier, she will begin to understand just how much control she has over her own existence.

Recommended by Allyson Dwyer

  • Even Flowers Bloom in Hell, Sometimes
    12 Aug. 2021
    You will feel this play, and feel it again, and again later, when you remember moments, or characters, or phrases. Franky has such a command of theatricality, the play begins to feel almost cinematic in its grasp of the characters and the soft, subtle windows into their worlds and the way he isn't afraid to break from patterns or form. His writing is deeply emotional, visceral, pulpy and pulsing with life, to the point that you feel as trapped and confined as Prisoner. I cannot recommend this play enough.
  • 1900s Women Bonding
    9 Aug. 2021
    Catherine is dangerously good at writing plays that put us in the headspace of its characters. In the same way these two housewives are never quite sure of their reality, we are left to question the reality of the play and the reality of these womens lives and how their interactions echo into modern day. It also has one of the funniest last lines I've ever read. A terrifying but hilarious read.
  • Light Switch
    8 Mar. 2021
    A vulnerable time-spanning story that treats the personal as a delicate epic, much like the Victorian romance novels that Henry reads. These stories are so inherent to who he is that in sharing them he gives a piece of himself each time. This play is no different - a fearless sharing that demands its audience weigh each word, each interaction, as we come to experience the world through Henry's eyes. Very beautifully crafted and moving.
  • This is How you Got Me Naked or My Sexy Fairytale
    7 Oct. 2020
    A modernly funny play, but also incredibly theatrical, and wondrous, and full of surprises. Catherine does an incredible job of ruminating not just on how painful it is for young women to navigate their sexuality, but also how absurd, especially with the added complicated layer of detached, millennial irony that seems to now permeate all of our communications. It's hard not to shiver at how real some of this is, but that makes it that much more powerful!