Rachel Greene

Rachel Greene

Rachel Greene (she/her) is a fat liberationist playwright, performer, and multi-hyphenate theatre artist with a passion for all types of explosive, brave, and challenging works of theatre. Rachel aims to create multi-dimensional fat woman characters and put them center stage. And not plucky, saccharine Tracy Turnblad-types; she's talking flawed, embodied, sexual, messy, vengeful, endearing, powerful fat...
Rachel Greene (she/her) is a fat liberationist playwright, performer, and multi-hyphenate theatre artist with a passion for all types of explosive, brave, and challenging works of theatre. Rachel aims to create multi-dimensional fat woman characters and put them center stage. And not plucky, saccharine Tracy Turnblad-types; she's talking flawed, embodied, sexual, messy, vengeful, endearing, powerful fat bodies. Her work most often wrestles with the thorny intersections of consent, agency, power dynamics pushed to their furthest extremes, fatphobia and fat liberation, academia, and gender and sexual politics. Rachel’s plays have been developed recently with Fresh Ink Theater, Artists’ Theater of Boston, First Kiss Theatre Company (where she is a Resident Artist), and Brandeis University Department of Theater Arts. When not creating art of her own, you can catch Rachel listening to angsty pop music or working as a staff member at the American Repertory Theater and as a core member of the Artists’ Theater of Boston. Rachel holds a degree in Theater Arts from Brandeis University.

Plays

  • John Deserves To Die
    All is calm until theater department favorite Professor Daniel Holmes casts unassuming freshman Laura Vogel as Carol in his Spring production of David Mamet’s Oleanna. No one is less pleased than ambitious, fat sophomore Jen Barnett, who threatens to expose a secret that could turn lives and careers upside down. When fiery student reporter Andy Stark starts to follow leads for an explosive exposé, it is only a...
    All is calm until theater department favorite Professor Daniel Holmes casts unassuming freshman Laura Vogel as Carol in his Spring production of David Mamet’s Oleanna. No one is less pleased than ambitious, fat sophomore Jen Barnett, who threatens to expose a secret that could turn lives and careers upside down. When fiery student reporter Andy Stark starts to follow leads for an explosive exposé, it is only a matter of time before dangerous truths come out. Art begins to imitate life as secrets unravel, masks come off, and classic texts are challenged. In this decidedly murderous exploration into the devilish intricacies of sex, power, consent, and gender politics in academia, three students take control in asking: If Carol was telling the story, wouldn’t John deserve to die?
  • Power Play: A Full-Length Play about Consent, Bodies, and Fat Liberation
    When overachieving, agreeable, and undeniably fat undergrad Sarah gets cast to play historical sex symbol Helen of Troy in a student production, she and her peers are forced to confront their understandings of beauty, sex, and fatness. To make matters more complicated, a budding tension between Sarah and her on-stage love interest Chris begs the student actors to ask where the characters end and the real bodies...
    When overachieving, agreeable, and undeniably fat undergrad Sarah gets cast to play historical sex symbol Helen of Troy in a student production, she and her peers are forced to confront their understandings of beauty, sex, and fatness. To make matters more complicated, a budding tension between Sarah and her on-stage love interest Chris begs the student actors to ask where the characters end and the real bodies begin. With a cast of all-too familiar characters, Power Play puts a magnifying glass to the underbelly of “liberal” and educational theatre-making and the bodies it continues to marginalize.
  • Margaret My Name
    Margaret My Name is an explosive adaptation of Shakespeare's first tetralogy retold from the perspective of the oft-neglected and villainized Queen Margaret of Anjou. Most popular scholarship ignores Margaret entirely, or else dismiss her as a villain; scholar Harold Bloom goes as far as to call her “termagant,” “any actress’ nightmare,” and “a ghastly widow, for whom Shakespeare never could compose a...
    Margaret My Name is an explosive adaptation of Shakespeare's first tetralogy retold from the perspective of the oft-neglected and villainized Queen Margaret of Anjou. Most popular scholarship ignores Margaret entirely, or else dismiss her as a villain; scholar Harold Bloom goes as far as to call her “termagant,” “any actress’ nightmare,” and “a ghastly widow, for whom Shakespeare never could compose a decent line.” This adaptation strives to tell the gentle, proud, and ruthless Queen Margaret’s story in its entirety, and to explore the capacity of modern artists to reclaim classical narratives for the women who drive them forward

Recommended by Rachel Greene

  • small town icons (a revenge play)
    9 Jul. 2022
    I absolutely could not put this play down! Perhaps it is because I was once also a theatre-kid teenager from a small religious town in Ohio, but this play and these characters rang so incredibly true to me. SMJ strikes the perfect balance of dark humor, true trauma and rage, and enticing mystery, all in the neat package of a fast-paced, engaging revenge play. This story is delicious, exciting, and easily one of my favorite plays I've read in recent memory. I can't wait for an opportunity to see it staged!
  • Here's What I Found
    8 Jul. 2022
    Here's What I Found is an imaginative and sobering exploration of the human (or perhaps robot) yearning for connection. Daniel swiftly and expertly builds a compelling world with characters that you want to see succeed in their quest for love. Not to mention, "salad dream ballet" is the stage direction I never knew that I was absolutely missing in my life! I would love to see this beautiful short play fully staged.