Katrin Arefy

Katrin Arefy

Katrin Arefy is an essayist and playwright based in Berkeley, California, whose creative nonfiction has appeared in Free State Review, Meat for Tea: The Valley Review, and Water~Stone Review, and was received with acclaim at numerous literary events in California, including Action Fiction in San Francisco and Roar Shack in Los Angeles. Her play The Elbisnopsers was selected by the Midtown International Theatre...
Katrin Arefy is an essayist and playwright based in Berkeley, California, whose creative nonfiction has appeared in Free State Review, Meat for Tea: The Valley Review, and Water~Stone Review, and was received with acclaim at numerous literary events in California, including Action Fiction in San Francisco and Roar Shack in Los Angeles. Her play The Elbisnopsers was selected by the Midtown International Theatre Festival [New York City] for production in the fall 2016 festival and reached the semifinalist round of the Ivoryton [Connecticut] Playhouse’s inaugural Women Playwright’s Initiative later that year. In 2018 the play was selected for production during the Iranian Drama Festival, which is held annually in Heidelberg, Germany, and was also performed at Central Stage in Richmond, California, in spring 2019. Katrin’s latest theatrical work is the trilogy Peace, a Massacre, and the Umbrella, which premiered at Plaxall Gallery in New York City in June 2019.

Katrin has a master’s degree in piano performance and pedagogy from the Gnessin Academy of Music in Moscow, Russia. When she is not writing, she is busy at Golden Key Piano School in Berkeley, where she is the artistic director and head teacher.

Plays

  • Peace, a Massacre, and the Umbrella
    Peace, a Massacre, and the Umbrella is a trilogy written in a surreal manner that aims to question the idea of us versus “the other.”

    Breaking news about a distant civilization turns the prosaic tedium of a middle class household’s day to a tempest in a teapot. Their attempt to overcome their fear-inducing ignorance by turning to their limited resources results in a farcical event.
    ...
    Peace, a Massacre, and the Umbrella is a trilogy written in a surreal manner that aims to question the idea of us versus “the other.”

    Breaking news about a distant civilization turns the prosaic tedium of a middle class household’s day to a tempest in a teapot. Their attempt to overcome their fear-inducing ignorance by turning to their limited resources results in a farcical event.

    Discovering a pile of dead bodies in the middle of their office, work colleagues seem nonchalant to the carnage and instead become embroiled in petty arguments. Their repetitive discussions and responses are predetermined and nonnegotiable.


    And finally, awakened by sounds from a machine that warns of impending danger, six pseudo-intellectual housemates get into endless groundless arguments, contradicting themselves and creating a cacophony of mad unreason. Unable to listen to each other or think outside of their very limited “open” minds, the characters are truer to our own world than we would like to believe.

    Like the other parts of the trilogy, Love Is a Carrot explores the question of how to oppose evil, this time by presenting fear and distrust on one hand and suicidal feebleness on the other.
  • Love is a Carrot! or Can You Love the Umbrella?
    Awakened by sounds from a machine that warns of impending danger, six pseudo-intellectual housemates get into endless groundless arguments, contradicting themselves and creating a cacophony of mad unreason. Unable to listen to each other or think outside of their very limited “open” minds, the characters are truer to our own world than we would like to believe.

    Like the other parts of the trilogy...
    Awakened by sounds from a machine that warns of impending danger, six pseudo-intellectual housemates get into endless groundless arguments, contradicting themselves and creating a cacophony of mad unreason. Unable to listen to each other or think outside of their very limited “open” minds, the characters are truer to our own world than we would like to believe.

    Like the other parts of the trilogy, Love Is a Carrot explores the question of how to oppose evil, this time by presenting fear and distrust on one hand and suicidal feebleness on the other.
  • A Massacre
    Discovering a pile of dead bodies in the middle of their office, work colleagues seem nonchalant to the carnage and instead become embroiled in petty arguments. Their repetitive discussions and responses are predetermined and nonnegotiable.

    Written in a surreal manner, A Massacre observes the bigger world we live in, and highlights the limitation of the smaller world in which we live—our minds.
  • The Elbisnopsers! or How Do You Say Their Damn Name?
    Breaking news about a distant civilization disturbs the quiet household of a middle class family, as three adults try to overcome their own fear-inducing ignorance. Turning to their limited resources, they manage to incite their dread of the unknown. The ensuing tempest in a teapot underscores how intercultural miscommunication and lack of knowledge can cause fear of anyone different or unfamiliar. Using a...
    Breaking news about a distant civilization disturbs the quiet household of a middle class family, as three adults try to overcome their own fear-inducing ignorance. Turning to their limited resources, they manage to incite their dread of the unknown. The ensuing tempest in a teapot underscores how intercultural miscommunication and lack of knowledge can cause fear of anyone different or unfamiliar. Using a humorous situation, The Elbisnopsers aims to question the idea of us versus “the other.”
  • The Dog, and the Shoe, and the Window
    This ten minute absurd play is about the norms that were imposed to us by our society. Can we question the norms? Even if we want to break out of them, how far outside of our box are we able to see?
  • The Portrait of an Angel, a Lion, a Monster
    The Portrait of an Angel, a Lion, a Monster is about transformation, miracles, and love.

    The play draws a honest portrait of an extraordinary man, his lover, and the scenes from their lovehood in the backdrop of Judaism.