Mark Alan Sanderson

Mark Alan Sanderson

Mark Alan Sanderson was educated as an architect, learned in the ways of productive imagination and making things, of people in places, and of form and structure in service to meaning and aesthetic. However, with a yearning to practice more in proximity to the immediate human condition than the construction of buildings allowed, he discovered playwriting as a more appropriate vehicle, better aligned with his...
Mark Alan Sanderson was educated as an architect, learned in the ways of productive imagination and making things, of people in places, and of form and structure in service to meaning and aesthetic. However, with a yearning to practice more in proximity to the immediate human condition than the construction of buildings allowed, he discovered playwriting as a more appropriate vehicle, better aligned with his fraught and bedeviled musing. An artistic director at a theater producing one of his plays once responded to the playwright’s background: “Well, that makes sense, since theater is architecture.” Such validation is, of course, essential to the sanity of the ever self-doubting, if not self-loathing, playwright...and so the bloodletting continues. Sanderson’s first play produced for a paying audience was staged in 2004.

Plays

  • Leftovers
    A man and his sister arrive at a tiny airport in the middle of nowhere to fulfill their father's last wish of having his ashes scattered over the highest mountain in Montana.
  • Perfect World
    A fearful and agitated young man in lock down is visited by a benevolent young woman who has come to try to save him from the insidious forces that torment him.
  • Porch Light
    A brother and sister on the cusp of middle age find themselves together on the back porch of their childhood home. With resentment and regret, they must try to come to terms with caring for their dying father, and the legacy of a broken family.
  • Threat Level Paradise: A Love Story
    When a young woman's agitated husband, searching for his lost wife in the mansion they inhabit on their large estate, finds her lounging in the entry foyer reading a book, their subsequent tete-a-tete reveals the truth of a relationship that in this very moment might be about to meet its none-too-inevitable end.