Alix Sobler

Alix Sobler

Alix Sobler is a writer from New York whose plays have been read, workshopped and produced in North America and England. In 2016, she had three plays produced, including her play The Secret Annex at the Segal Centre in Montreal, JONNO, at the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival andThe Great Divide, at the Finborough Theatre in London. In 2015, The Great Divide won the Canadian Jewish Playwriting Competition. She...
Alix Sobler is a writer from New York whose plays have been read, workshopped and produced in North America and England. In 2016, she had three plays produced, including her play The Secret Annex at the Segal Centre in Montreal, JONNO, at the Winnipeg Fringe Theatre Festival andThe Great Divide, at the Finborough Theatre in London. In 2015, The Great Divide won the Canadian Jewish Playwriting Competition. She is a graduate of Brown University, and will receive her MFA in playwriting from Columbia University in 2017. You can find out more about her and her work at alixsobler.com.

Plays

  • Sheltered
    Helen and Leonard Kirsch were two ordinary Americans living and working in Philadelphia when war broke out in Europe. In a moment that would change the lives of generations, they made an extraordinary decision: while millions of Jews were trying to escape Europe, Helen and Leonard were planning a trip into Nazi occupied Europe, and were making arrangements to take 50 children back out with them to the United...
    Helen and Leonard Kirsch were two ordinary Americans living and working in Philadelphia when war broke out in Europe. In a moment that would change the lives of generations, they made an extraordinary decision: while millions of Jews were trying to escape Europe, Helen and Leonard were planning a trip into Nazi occupied Europe, and were making arrangements to take 50 children back out with them to the United States and to safety. Desperate to find enough places for the refugee children to live, the Kraus’ resort to asking an estranged friend from a violent home to take in a child. But when trying to convince a mother to give over her child, they are forced to question that decision.
  • The Secret Annex
    Anne Frank has survived the war, and at age 25, she’s ready to start a new chapter in New York City. Eager to publish a memoir of her time in hiding, Anne is sure it will launch her career as a writer. But when the only inte rested publisher demands drastic rewrites, Anne questions the meaning of her new life. Why did she survive, if not to share stories?
  • The Glass Piano
    Alexandra thought her life would never change. Living in the castle with her father, the failed poet, her maid, the wise Galstina, and catching glimpses of her mother as she runs from the stables to the rose bushes, trying not get caught by the palace guard. And of course, there was the grand piano made of glass that she swallowed as a child, sitting inside her at all times. But then Lucien arrives and suddenly...
    Alexandra thought her life would never change. Living in the castle with her father, the failed poet, her maid, the wise Galstina, and catching glimpses of her mother as she runs from the stables to the rose bushes, trying not get caught by the palace guard. And of course, there was the grand piano made of glass that she swallowed as a child, sitting inside her at all times. But then Lucien arrives and suddenly, anything seems possible.
  • The Great Divide
    On Saturday, March 25, 1911, at 4:45 pm, someone started screaming “Fire!” on the 8th floor of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory on the lower east side of Manhattan. Within10 minutes, 146 workers, most of them young women, most of them recent immigrants from some of the most oppressed countries in the world at the time, lay dead, either on the floor of the sweatshop, or on the street nine stories below. The...
    On Saturday, March 25, 1911, at 4:45 pm, someone started screaming “Fire!” on the 8th floor of the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory on the lower east side of Manhattan. Within10 minutes, 146 workers, most of them young women, most of them recent immigrants from some of the most oppressed countries in the world at the time, lay dead, either on the floor of the sweatshop, or on the street nine stories below. The Great Divide tells the story of just a few of these doomed workers, the lives they led, and the lessons they learned during their time in the American garment district. It is a tragic, and unfortunately timely, story that remains relevant today.
  • Bed Bug
    Floyd might be the world’s worst boyfriend…he’s lazy, he’s a mooch, he’s selfish, and did I mention he’s a bed bug? But when push comes to shove, Jane isn’t sure she can really live without him. Bed Bug is a play about a power struggle between two, cohabiting beings, and the sacrifices of self we make in order to not end up alone. You know…comedy!
  • Last Night in Inwood
    A disaster in NYC has everyone on the island looking for high ground. Danny, a Jewish 30-something social worker, has holed up in her one-bedroom apartment in Inwood, where she is joined by her father Max, a conservative dentist, and her aunt Sheila, an aging hippy. They are waiting for Danny’s husband Cal to return from a supply run, and for Danny’s brother and his family who were headed north from the West...
    A disaster in NYC has everyone on the island looking for high ground. Danny, a Jewish 30-something social worker, has holed up in her one-bedroom apartment in Inwood, where she is joined by her father Max, a conservative dentist, and her aunt Sheila, an aging hippy. They are waiting for Danny’s husband Cal to return from a supply run, and for Danny’s brother and his family who were headed north from the West Village. They are soon joined by neighbor Jazz, a 19-year old Dominican-American college student, and Billy, a 30-something Asian-American, gay actor. It becomes clear that the immediate disaster is the culmination of the entire country falling apart, a combined effect of climate change disasters, economic distress, the rise of white supremacy militias, and the increase of looting and rioting across the country. As the impending doom creeps into the apartment, the tensions between these very different people begins to mount. There are arguments based on different generational views, disagreements based on race, economic status, religious views and political leanings. As the play goes on, the crisis they are facing becomes more and more real. First they watch as Times Square is flooded by sea water live on NY1, then, the power goes out. They are warned not to leave the apartment by the Emergency Broadcast System through a short wave radio. When Cal returns to the apartment in Act 2, he reveals that things outside are worse than they imagined. The people that are left on the island are being rounded up by the army and put into encampments, where they are separating people based on religion and race to “keep the peace”. ISIS is suspected to be behind major explosions in other states. Packs of wild dogs are terrorizing New Jersey. Cal wants to head for Canada immediately. Major arguments ensue, revealing an ongoing argument between Cal and Danny about what it will take to survive this kind of crisis, and finally, between Danny and her father about being willing to face the truth, and relying on each other instead of faith to save them. In the end, Canada is too far, and the camps are too dangerous, so they decide to head for the caves in Inwood Hill park, where they will do their best to survive on their own, but together, as a new tribe. Before they are able to leave, there is a knock at the door. Unsure who it is, Danny approaches the door with a drawn gun, her family and friends behind her, ready to face whoever waits on the other side of the door.