Douglas Langworthy

Douglas Langworthy

Douglas Langworthy is the Literary Director/Director of New Play Development at the Denver Center Theatre Company. He held similar positions at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the McCarter Theatre. He has translated fifteen plays from the German, by playwrights Brecht, Wedekind, Hans Henny Jahnn, Heiner Müller and Heinrich von Kleist, among others. His translation of Goethe’s Faust was produced in 2006 in...
Douglas Langworthy is the Literary Director/Director of New Play Development at the Denver Center Theatre Company. He held similar positions at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the McCarter Theatre. He has translated fifteen plays from the German, by playwrights Brecht, Wedekind, Hans Henny Jahnn, Heiner Müller and Heinrich von Kleist, among others. His translation of Goethe’s Faust was produced in 2006 in New York by Target Margin Theater and the Classic Stage Company. He co-wrote the libretto for The Sandman, an opera based on an E.T.A. Hoffmann story with music by Thomas Cabaniss, directed by David Herskovits. With Linda Alper and Penny Metropulos he adapted The Three Musketeers and the musical Tracy’s Tiger, both of which premiered at the Oregon Shakespeare Festival.

Plays

  • Amphitryon by Heinrich von Kleist translated
    When Jupiter comes down to earth to spend an evening with the lovely Alcmena in the guise of her husband, Amphitryon, a true comedy of errors ensues. And it's double the fun when his servant Mercury takes on the form of Amphitryon's servant Sosia. But things take a more serious turn when Jupiter forces Almena to choose which is her true husband.
  • Penthesilea by Heinrich von Kleist translated
    In the midst of the Trojan War, the Amazons attack the Greeks, seeking husbands with whom to propagate the next generation of female warriors. But when Penthesilea, the Amazon queen, clashes with Greek hero Achilles, the war grinds to a halt for the two of them. Can love exist alongside war, especially between to leaders? This remarkable play plays out this question with tragic results.
  • The Prince of Homburg by Heinrich von Kleist, translated
    Prince Friedrich jumps into battle prematurely against the Elector's explicit orders. But did he hear those orders when they were given? And if not, who is to blame? In this German classic, individualism and obedience are pitted against one another to great effect.
  • The Good Person of Szechuan by Bertolt Brecht translated
    When the gods come down to earth to find just one good person to prove that human beings can survive despite the economic hardships around them, they put their money in the good-hearted Shen Te. But the windfall they give her just get her into more trouble, and she has to invent a ruthless cousin, Shui Ta, to come and save her. This play has vibrant characters, a thrilling plot and even a half dozen songs. What...
    When the gods come down to earth to find just one good person to prove that human beings can survive despite the economic hardships around them, they put their money in the good-hearted Shen Te. But the windfall they give her just get her into more trouble, and she has to invent a ruthless cousin, Shui Ta, to come and save her. This play has vibrant characters, a thrilling plot and even a half dozen songs. What GOOD PERSON has to say about the differences between the haves and the have-nots couldn't make it more relevant.
  • Spring Awakening by Frank Wedekind translated
    In this original, non-musical version of Wedekind's play, a group of German teenagers find that their first sexual stirrings are met with silence and misinformation by the adults around them. Although tragic at times, the play is also rich with humor and love of life.
  • Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence adapted by Art Manke and
    In the wake of World War I, as England is reeling from change all around, the Brangwen sisters--Ursula and Gudrun--search for love that will offer them security and comfort that is, at the same time, unfettered by societal expectations and constraints. They find it, respectively, with the bohemian Rupert Birkin and the deeply troubled industrialist Gerald Crich. As they travel from the confines of England to...
    In the wake of World War I, as England is reeling from change all around, the Brangwen sisters--Ursula and Gudrun--search for love that will offer them security and comfort that is, at the same time, unfettered by societal expectations and constraints. They find it, respectively, with the bohemian Rupert Birkin and the deeply troubled industrialist Gerald Crich. As they travel from the confines of England to the chilling freedom of the Alps, their foursome is fractured by erotic impulses, unrequited love and a harrowing suicide. What is, perhaps, most remarkable in D.H. Lawrence's classic, is Rupert's radical search for a relationship with a man that would be equal to his relationship with a woman. This desire to redefine and re-label relationships continues to this day.