Nat Cassidy

Nat Cassidy

"We’re nearing the point that when Nat Cassidy is in something or writes something or produces something, we just show up without needing any further information." - Maxamoo

Nat Cassidy is an award-winning playwright/director and a sandwich-winning musician. His plays have been nominated for a combined total of 17 New York Innovative Theatre Awards, including three times for...
"We’re nearing the point that when Nat Cassidy is in something or writes something or produces something, we just show up without needing any further information." - Maxamoo

Nat Cassidy is an award-winning playwright/director and a sandwich-winning musician. His plays have been nominated for a combined total of 17 New York Innovative Theatre Awards, including three times for Outstanding Full-Length Script (which he won in 2009, as well as in 2011 for Outstanding Solo Performance). He was commissioned by The Kennedy Center for the libretto of a world premiere opera (with composer Scott Perkins), which the Washington Times called "brilliant ... remarkable." His play ANY DAY NOW was chosen as part of Primary Stages' ESPADrills in 2014 and received a workshop directed by Tony-nominee Moritz von Stuelpnagel. His plays have been produced numerous times in New York City, as well as across the country, and have been published by Sam French, New York Theatre Experience, Smith & Kraus, Applause, and Indie Theatre Now. Critics have called Cassidy's work "mesmerizing ... one of the creepiest [plays] I've ever seen" (StageBuzz), "amazing, unforgettable [and] absolutely electrifying" (Bloomberg Radio), and "anyone who appreciates theater that aims at both the head and the gut will appreciate [this play]. And it will haunt you for days to come" (Tulsa World). He is an inductee in the Indie Theater Hall of Fame and was an NY Theatre Person of the Year in 2011.

"Nat Cassidy has a smart, loud voice, pierced with black humor. Acutely aware, he can scare you to death, hurt your heart, but keep you laughing. A fresh new voice who has arrived right on time." - Academy Award nominee Joan Tewkesbury (screenwriter, Robert Altman's Nashville, Thieves Like Us)

Plays

  • Any Day Now
    As the world wrestles with the sociological, biological, and theological meanings behind unexplained resurrections of the recently deceased, one Connecticut family learns that secrets cannot stay buried and that the ones you love may be the ones who eat you alive.

    ******PRESS: "Neatly off-kilter, with the audience never quite sure whether to laugh or to gasp. Cassidy packages his...
    As the world wrestles with the sociological, biological, and theological meanings behind unexplained resurrections of the recently deceased, one Connecticut family learns that secrets cannot stay buried and that the ones you love may be the ones who eat you alive.

    ******PRESS: "Neatly off-kilter, with the audience never quite sure whether to laugh or to gasp. Cassidy packages his supernatural theme with such naturalistic aplomb that he evokes David Lynch, particularly the very first episode of TWIN PEAKS, where you were trying to decipher the creator's intent while increasingly jaw-dropping weirdness unfolded uncontrollably before your eyes. ... Filled with surprises and rewards." - Martin Denton, nytheatre.com (starred review).

    "Genius. You're being thrown for a loop from the moment the lights come up and are entertained for all three acts. A great play for a myriad of reasons ... one that is full of laughs in the right spots. ... The play delivers, with a surprising ending that holds the audience in the palm of its hand... Exceptional ... Keeps the audience fascinated for three hours. This is like Sam Shepard meets George Romero, with more emphasis on the former artist than the latter." - Dianna Martin, The Fab Marquee.

    "A vibrant drama, centering on a family whose patriarch returns from the dead during a pandemic of unexplained resurrections. The family members seek to both relate and deny the significance of their own ordinary problems — elderly dementia, closet homosexuality, alcoholism — to the global implications of the zombie appearances. A gritty family drama heightened by a clever allegory for larger social issues. ... The play's themes are compelling and clear." - Show Business Weekly.

    "ANY DAY NOW, written and directed by Nat Cassidy, drew me on a cold and wet Saturday night in January. I don't often get to cover off/off Broadway, for there is something going on there almost daily and nightly, but I'm glad I came down to see this. ... Cassidy has a gift for dialogue and characterization. ... Not your usual run-of-the-mill family comedy (or drama, for that matter). ... Tight, suspenseful and scary." - Richard Seff, D.C. Theatre Scene.

    “Nat Cassidy's ANY DAY NOW [is a] dark and troubling mix of kitchen-sink black comedy and stark horror ... Yet Cassidy's writing is so sharp that this play holds one's attention like a vise. ... It has its shocks of horror and hilarity - the early scenes are larded with coal-black comedy. But Any Day Now delves into a great many deeper, more challenging issues, raising questions about religious ideas, political motivations, the uncertainties of science, the damage that fear and hate can inflict. ... The sisters' climactic confrontation is shattering. ... It's a show that anyone who appreciates theater that aims at both the head and the gut will appreciate. And it will haunt you for days to come.” - James D. Watts, Jr., Tulsa World
  • The Temple, or, Lebensraum
    Nominated for the 2015 New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Full-Length Script. A claustrophobic descent into terror set aboard a sunken U-Boat in the middle of WWII, as the crew fights to survive despite their dwindling oxygen and being trapped with a madman.

    ******PRESS: "Incredibly brave and patient ... [A] genuinely magnificent piece of theater. Watching a talented artist...
    Nominated for the 2015 New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Full-Length Script. A claustrophobic descent into terror set aboard a sunken U-Boat in the middle of WWII, as the crew fights to survive despite their dwindling oxygen and being trapped with a madman.

    ******PRESS: "Incredibly brave and patient ... [A] genuinely magnificent piece of theater. Watching a talented artist like Cassidy deconstruct and then reconstruct the source code of Lovecraft’s story and style is a helluva thing to see. ... Like the characters in the play, you are completely submerged in the events of the play, and when THE TEMPLE OR LEBENSRAUM wants to it strikes its audience like a perfectly aimed torpedo." (Mitch Montgomery, Surreal Time Press).

    "Death is the undiscovered country, and THE TEMPLE is an expedition to map the unseeable. ...[T]he play ends on a masterful note of narrative suspension you should witness for yourself, it’s clear, and inescapable, and maybe even reassuring, that there’s always a longer way down." (Adam McGovern, Fanchild).

    "This tense, literally breathtaking situation is the stuff of a story by 20th century visionary H.P. Lovecraft and of an even better dramatization by Nat Cassidy. ... THE TEMPLE OR LEBENSRAUM will bring you on that terrifying, liberating adventure. ... Most amazing ... Scares everyone to death ... Effortlessly universal in the way ALL QUIET ON THE WESTERN FRONT tries to be." (Ed Malin, NY Theater Now).

    "Nat Cassidy's adaptation of Lovecraft's THE TEMPLE is such a delight. Well, as much of a delight as anything involving mutilation, suffocation, cannibalism, Nazis and the elder gods can be. Cassidy is a strong storyteller; one who fully appreciates just how powerful the combination of excellent actors, fraught situations, and an audience's imagination can be. ... Cassidy knows that the real drama comes, not from any monsters, but from the relationships between the characters, especially in how they react to the Nazi officer in their midst. ... Watching the character go from a bumbling PR man to a psychotic killer is amazing. ... I should also point out that one of my favorite moments of the play was during a scene where the men were running out of air. The actors were arranged on the floor trying to breathe. No dialogue. Just breathing. The amazing thing is that the audience was rapt the entire time." (Byrne Harrison, Stagebuzz).

    "Disturbing ... Fascinating ... I admired this greatly." (Eva Heinemann, Hi Drama).

    "A horrorshow of the claustrophobic lives of German submariners and the evil that consumes them ... [A] living, breathing, immersive spectacle. ... Make[s] the horror of the sea, of WWII, and of the Lovecraftian-influenced Gnostic psychodrama all too real. ... [Heinrich is] one of the most chilling displays of inhumanity that I’ve ever seen onstage. He is a true devil, in the most Christian sense of the word, all charm and bonhomie, doing nothing more than opening the door to horrors that the regular men of the ship seem all-to-easily able to commit." (Michael Niederman, New York Theater Review).

    "Tortured by both real and psychological dangers, the sailors nevertheless preserve their sense of humor ... reminding us that even in the worst of times there’s always something to smile about. ... Although “The Temple” has a specific political context, even those who do not know a lot about German history will enjoy the play. It is not only the story of Nazi Germany; it is also the story of soldiers, protecting their country and of individuals willing to survive in the face of grave danger. ... Engaging and worth our time and attention." (Ekaterina Lalo, Reviewfix).

    "Does an effective job of imparting the mundane horrors of life on board a submarine. ... Lovecraft fans will be happy to see one of his lesser stories brought to life, but the weird science themes are just there for flavor. The true goal of the show is to explore the lives of men who fought for the wrong side of a war. THE TEMPLE OR LEBENSRAUM does this admirably." (Charles Battersby, Theater for Nerds).
  • The Reckoning of Kit & Little Boots
    Winner of the 2009 New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Full-Length Script.

    As he lies dying of a stab wound to the face, Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe’s life flashes before his eyes (or rather, eye); his host for this journey is his own personal Mephistopheles, the character about whom he never got to write: the insane Roman emperor, Caligula.

    ***PRESS...
    Winner of the 2009 New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Full-Length Script.

    As he lies dying of a stab wound to the face, Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe’s life flashes before his eyes (or rather, eye); his host for this journey is his own personal Mephistopheles, the character about whom he never got to write: the insane Roman emperor, Caligula.

    ***PRESS: "Caligula is a fab character, and an irresistible one ... He gets to recount anecdote after anecdote of Caligula's astonishing, depraved, mythic existence ... But fun in its way as this all is, the heart of Cassidy's play—and the best parts of it—have nothing to do with the Roman emperor. Marlowe is the play's protagonist, after all, and it is what he learns from his experiences ... that really fuel this Reckoning. What I liked best about the play is the way that Cassidy contemporizes Marlowe's existence without in any way diminishing it. ... Cassidy nails what's universal about a character like Marlowe ... One thing's certain: there's talent aplenty on display here. Cassidy is clearly a young theatre artist to watch."
    - Martin Denton, nytheatre.com.

    "An incredibly fun show about the death and legacy of Christopher Marlowe (sort of) and his failed attempt to write a play about Caligula ... THE RECKONING OF KIT & LITTLE BOOTS is a very inventive and funny play that gives Marlowe the Charlie Kaufman treatment." —James Comtois, Jamespeak, #6 in his "Top 10 of 2008."

    "Brilliant, irreverent, original - and very, very different from what the phrase 'a play on Marlowe' tends to make us imagine. ... And there are issues of identity, of art, of humanity, of power - all served with plenty of effective dialogue and black humor. You laugh, you're surprised, you reflect ... [A] great discovery!" - Chiara Prezzavento, Senza Errori di Stumpa (in Italian).

    "A great comedy!"
    - Chicago Magazine.

    "A winter season must see ... THE RECKONING OF KIT & LITTLE BOOTS laces together bawdy humor and historical speculation with charming measure ... Cassidy combines the most dramatic and accurate suppositions of [Marlowe's] history. Using sharp humor and adventurous thinking, Cassidy’s story ultimately pays homage to Marlowe’s tremendous talent. ... The skill on display is beyond commendable and consistent in its entertainment factor. ... [A] manically funny delight ... full of passionate questioning ... THE RECKONING OF KIT & LITTLE BOOTS is a golden affair." - Brian Kirst, Sights and Sounds Magazine

    "RECOMMENDED. ... In sharp comic exchanges punctuated by violence, these two characters (and other Caesars and Elizabethan playwrights) explore the use and abuse of power, the necessary but despised role of the spy, and the challenge of writing simultaneously for one’s own time and for the ages. ... A production both intellectual and visceral, whereas so often we have to choose one or the other." - Dueling Critics.

    "Caligula is a spicy character, filled with sarcasm and bombastic energy, yet still manages to draw sympathy from the audience ... Cassidy [does] a great job of telling the tale of a lesser-known figure in history. There’s a perfect balance between truth and irony: Known events about Marlowe’s life struggle to be remembered, riddled with inappropriate modern-day humor and outlandish responses from the supporting cast — let’s just say the sexual tension is aplenty. ... Overall, Cassidy’s take on Marlowe’s life is pleasantly refreshing. His characters are all filled with spunk, and it is a great take on an often forgotten Elizabethan playwright. The struggles of power, religion and murder are always welcomed in tragic productions, and Cassidy managed to balance them all in a slightly perfect drama. ... Cassidy [brings] together everything audiences could want in a play. ... Stepping out of a cramped, crowded, black box theater after witnessing all the tragedy, comedy and witty skepticism of Christopher Marlowe‘s life just felt so wrong. A performance packed with actors and a script both acted and written at such a high caliber deserves way more than a couple seats set up around minimal stage space. " - Kristen Torres, Loyola Phoenix.

    "The acting, staging, the glimpses of humor and the sheer likeability of Marlowe, Caligula and several of the other characters make it easy to get lost in their Elizabethan world. ... Skirts the edge of Monty Python spoof and meaty drama ... This is a great pick for any anglophile, history buff, or lover of historical fiction. TROK&LB manages to be fun and serious, lighthearted and full of gravitas. Wonderful performances and a sharp script with a modern edge keep everyone on their toes." - Beth Dugan, EDGE
  • Tenants, or, When the Hornet Arrives
    M and G's new apartment is nothing special--it really could be any generic New York City apartment--but they're hoping it's a place of healing, a new beginning after a traumatic encounter with a former friend. Unfortunately, the previous tenant of this apartment isn't a man who likes to let go ... and he wasn't ready to move out. First, it's little things: their mail disappears, it...
    M and G's new apartment is nothing special--it really could be any generic New York City apartment--but they're hoping it's a place of healing, a new beginning after a traumatic encounter with a former friend. Unfortunately, the previous tenant of this apartment isn't a man who likes to let go ... and he wasn't ready to move out. First, it's little things: their mail disappears, it feels like someone's watching them, he stops by occasionally just to say hi and see what they've done with the place. But soon, when G is called out of town for business, M is left alone, and before they know it, they wake up to find themselves immobilized and watching as the previous tenant begins to make the apartment his own again.
  • The Demon Hunter
    A troubled boy grows dangerously obsessed with creatures of darkness. A mysterious street magician perfects a devastating new trick. And a single mother near the breaking point meets with a new therapist in order to better understand the terrifying thoughts that have begun to possess her.
  • Old Familiar Faces
    Nominated for the 2014 New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Full Length Script.

    "Where are they gone, the old familiar faces?" In 1786, author Mary Lamb commits a horrifying act of bloodshed and her brother Charles learns to forgive. In 2013, a talented man refuses to change and his brilliant lover learns to evolve. OLD FAMILIAR FACES is a heartbreaking, time-jumping drama...
    Nominated for the 2014 New York Innovative Theatre Award for Outstanding Full Length Script.

    "Where are they gone, the old familiar faces?" In 1786, author Mary Lamb commits a horrifying act of bloodshed and her brother Charles learns to forgive. In 2013, a talented man refuses to change and his brilliant lover learns to evolve. OLD FAMILIAR FACES is a heartbreaking, time-jumping drama about four lives, bound by obsession, rocked by madness, and saved by blank verse. Based on the true life story of Charles and Mary Lamb, interwoven with a contemporary American "adaptation" of the true romance between Laurence Olivier and Vivien Leigh.

    ******PRESS: "[A] wise and moving new play ... The play enacts some of the most tender connections and most honest and aware accounts of mental illness and disintegrating relationships I’ve ever seen ... As heartbreaking as anything in the theatrical canon." - Adam McGovern, Fanchild.

    "[M]agical ... [Shakespeare's] verse is so beautifully illuminated by Cassidy’s storytelling, knowledge of Shakespeare is not a pre-requisite for enjoying the show. ... [S]o poetic, so full of insight and understanding, so much brilliance on stage." - Sarah Tuft, Usher Nonsense

    "Brimming with acerbic wit ... Ingenious ... The counterpoint here is spectacular, not to mention ballsy. It takes a lot of nerve for a playwright to put his own text right next to – literally – the greatest words ever written for the theater. Cassidy pulls it off, mostly thanks to the dry sense of humor sneaking through the piece and giving it mischievous life." - Mitch Montgomery, Surreal Time Press.

    "Cassidy [is] a seismic talent ... He is a craftsman of the stage, and earns one’s trust from the start. ... I can’t imagine another contemporary playwright who would think to use the slang, insults, and bawdy humor of Shakespeare as a way to inform the inner and outer lives of his non-Shakespearean characters. It’s a gutsy move characteristic of Cassidy, and one that perhaps only he could pull off successfully." - Nathaniel Kressen, nytheatre.com.

    "Impressionistic, funny and personal ... Gorgeously written." - Susyanne Dottino, Show Business Weekly | "This new play reinvents and thrills. ... Cassidy weaves an ornate tapestry full of little gems of searing humor, haunting violence, deep regret, and profound love. ... Cassidy's language envelops you. At times, it is reminiscent of Christopher Durang and even Tony Kushner. One moment you are laughing hysterically and the next you are questioning everything you know." - Shawna Cormier, Theatre is Easy.

    "Combining quotations from Shakespeare and his own blank verse, Cassidy presents us with much that is beautiful and moving. To combine his own writing with Shakespeare's takes, what?, daring, courage, ego, balls? But Cassidy pulls it off, and the play is an aural pleasure." - Wendy Caster, Show Showdown.

    "We’re nearing the point that when Nat Cassidy is in something or writes something or produces something, we just show up without needing any further information." - Maxamoo
  • Goldsboro
    An ambitious reporter and a hapless scientist stumble upon a family of nuclear irradiated mutants living in the middle of the deserts of the American Southwest. An impossibly dark comedy, with a heartfelt wink at the works of William Inge, featuring the most warped family imaginable, Goldsboro is unlike anything you've ever seen, and yet frighteningly familiar.
  • Pierce
    1852. Political unknown Franklin Pierce is elected in a landslide victory to be our nation's 14th President. Three months later, on his journey to prepare for his inauguration, he is witness to an unspeakable tragedy that changes his life forever. Pierce tells the tragic and horrifying story of our most obscure leader, haunted beyond comprehension and driven desperately to distraction, as his country...
    1852. Political unknown Franklin Pierce is elected in a landslide victory to be our nation's 14th President. Three months later, on his journey to prepare for his inauguration, he is witness to an unspeakable tragedy that changes his life forever. Pierce tells the tragic and horrifying story of our most obscure leader, haunted beyond comprehension and driven desperately to distraction, as his country crawls its way towards civil war unnoticed. A ghost story unlike any other, set in that most haunted of houses: the White House.
  • At the Breakaway
    What begins as a slacker comedy about a small group of drifting young adults working at a futuristic refueling station in space quickly turns dramatic when they are besieged by what appears to be a roving band of genocidal maniacs.
  • Foundations
    There's a new apartment complex being built in your neighborhood: Melody Gardens, offering luxury living at affordable prices. But one day, as they wait for a rainstorm to pass, the construction crew of Melody Gardens begins trading stories about the dreams they've been having lately. Each one has a horror story to share, and they're about to learn: stories are like buildings. We design them. We...
    There's a new apartment complex being built in your neighborhood: Melody Gardens, offering luxury living at affordable prices. But one day, as they wait for a rainstorm to pass, the construction crew of Melody Gardens begins trading stories about the dreams they've been having lately. Each one has a horror story to share, and they're about to learn: stories are like buildings. We design them. We live in them. And sometimes, they turn out to be haunted.
  • Songs of Love: A Theatrical Mixtape
    Genital warts. Mothmen. Decapitation. Pornography. Bagel fucking. And, of course ... love. Songs of Love is a collection of terrifyingly twisted, outrageously heartfelt love stories and songs that is as unpredictable and familiar as those 90-minute cassettes you know you're still holding onto.

    ******PRESS: "It’s like an episode of Kids in the Hall written by Ionesco and scored by...
    Genital warts. Mothmen. Decapitation. Pornography. Bagel fucking. And, of course ... love. Songs of Love is a collection of terrifyingly twisted, outrageously heartfelt love stories and songs that is as unpredictable and familiar as those 90-minute cassettes you know you're still holding onto.

    ******PRESS: "It’s like an episode of Kids in the Hall written by Ionesco and scored by Jonathan Richman. This mixtape is so diverse that at times it can be hard to believe that the same writer wrote them all, and is a testament to Cassidy’s versatility that he did. ... Cassidy’s voice is truly unique, confident, and strong. [Some of the short plays] are so gorgeous they just about defy gravity. ... I wrote nearly half the thing down verbatim in my notebook as I watched because I wanted to make sure I’d remember those lines.... At the end of the evening, my date turned to me and said, 'This restored my faith in theater,' and it’s easy to see why. Mixtape is compassionate, hysterical, and has moments of gut-punching raw beauty." - Mariah MacCarthy, The Happiest Medium.

    "Fabulous ... I crumbled. Tears poured down my face and I wasn’t even embarrassed. ... [A] force of nature ... Hilarious ... The last piece may be the most warped first date I’ve ever witnessed or heard of. I could feel the audience freeze in their seats. ... Expect to laugh. Expect to relate. Expect to remember past love. Expect to speculate over current love. Expect to look to future love. Expect to cry. Expect to be moved. Expect to fall in love with this mixtape." - Katelyn Collins, Around the Fringe in 20 Plays.

    "Nat Cassidy is an audacious fellow. His brand-new pastiche of twisted short plays and quirky folk-rock is perfectly suited to the sensibilities of FringeNYC festivalgoers' demographic. He’s clearly poured his heart into the project ... Brilliant satire ... [Cassidy’s musical offerings] are truly inventive and well-utilized – a flattering imitation of Jonathan Richman from the film There's Something about Mary came to mind. ... I will be looking forward to Cassidy’s next project, even if it’s a set of covers." - Josh Sherman, nytheatre.com.

    "Songs of Love does not disappoint." - David Roberts, Theatre Reviews Limited

    "Cleverly written ... Complex and heartfelt ... It’s not often that a stage play throws you a curve that you don’t see coming at all. ... I may never look at my wife’s purse the same way again." - Russ Bickerstaff, Express Milwaukee
  • Songs of Blood: A Theatrical Mixtape
    The dark and twisted sequel to the 2012 FringeNYC hit SONGS OF LOVE, SONGS OF BLOOD is another "theatrical mixtape," full of short plays, monologues, and original music, each one a wickedly delightful exploration of fear and horror. Strap in for an evening of cannibals, werewolves, mutants, ventriloquists, sentient mushrooms, and toe-tapping folkrock, all of which will stick in your head and follow you home ...
  • The Eternal Husband
    A stomach-tightening contemporary noir thriller, loosely based on the Dostoevsky novella of the same name, about a flailing private detective whose life is turned upside-down during a brutal summer heatwave by a visit from an erratic, unpredictable old man wearing a heavy black coat.

    ******PRESS: "Nat Cassidy's starkly original adaptation of Dostoevsky's The Eternal Husband is,...
    A stomach-tightening contemporary noir thriller, loosely based on the Dostoevsky novella of the same name, about a flailing private detective whose life is turned upside-down during a brutal summer heatwave by a visit from an erratic, unpredictable old man wearing a heavy black coat.

    ******PRESS: "Nat Cassidy's starkly original adaptation of Dostoevsky's The Eternal Husband is, amazing, unforgettable. ... absolutely electrifying ... generates heat that is pure brilliance. This is 75 minutes you must not miss!" - Joe Franklin, Bloomberg Radio

    "The Eternal Husband is a well-executed noir drama, staged simply and with utmost confidence by writer/director Nat Cassidy ...The material is startlingly well structured ... Certainly, among the shows I've seen thus far in this year's festival, The Eternal Husband offers the most enjoyable night of theater. I can't wait for Cassidy's next creation." - Nathaniel Kressen, nytheatre.com

    "Nat Cassidy's The Eternal Husband has pretty much everything. Moments of sheer terror mixed with darkly funny humour; a romantic core with a violent exterior. But my gosh does it work. Running at a mere seventy five minutes there isn't a dull moment. Yet, it is not just the excitement that is so impressive but the careful layers of thoughtful philosophy. ... Cassidy makes the material work on its own terms, pacing things beautifully, letting the shocking conclusion breathe rather than overwhelm. ... The skilled cast conjures fully formed characters ... An impressive piece of work by any standards. I'd love to see Cassidy's adaptation given a slightly more polished production, the scope for terror could only increase, but at the tiny La MaMa theatre this is still, in every way, worth a look." - Robert Walport, The Tyro Theatre Critic
  • Into the Life of Things
    Two tense lovers find transcendence of an unexpectedly horrific nature at an isolated yoga retreat.

    ******PRESS: "[T]he evening’s standout segment [is] INTO THE LIFE OF THINGS by Nat Cassidy. Cassidy has a stereophonic ear for both the insider’s delusion and the outsider’s confusion (each of which will be duly punished) at a wilderness yoga retreat, where supernatural complications ensue...
    Two tense lovers find transcendence of an unexpectedly horrific nature at an isolated yoga retreat.

    ******PRESS: "[T]he evening’s standout segment [is] INTO THE LIFE OF THINGS by Nat Cassidy. Cassidy has a stereophonic ear for both the insider’s delusion and the outsider’s confusion (each of which will be duly punished) at a wilderness yoga retreat, where supernatural complications ensue which will land one lucky disciple in the Blood Brothers’ new place of residence. As a believer sworn to silence, Stephanie Willing enacts a sublime kinetic narrative of danced and gestured expression (and embodies just as pristine pretension when her character breaks the vow), while Matthew Trumbull as her doubting husband paces out of his yoga-pretzels with a positively Chaplinesque totter, his expression set in a world-exhausted facial drawl worthy of Keaton — more of the Brothers’ history-repeated-as-not-so-funny — and August Schulenburg is tragic and hilarious as a guru spouting Cassidy’s gourmet psychobabble." - Adam McGovern, Fanchild.

    "The evening features some amazing writing from Blood Brother stalwarts Nat Cassidy and Mac Rogers, as well as some strong directing from Pete Boisvert, Patrick Shearer and Stephanie Cox-Williams. ... Nasty, horrifying, and so incredibly well done. ... The surprise of the evening was Cassidy's INTO THE LIFE OF THINGS, about the yoga retreat. A young couple falls under the spell of a charismatic leader. Throw in some food deprivation, a touch of psychic ability, and a possible love triangle and the retreat takes a homicidal turn. This was a strong, well-structured story with an unexpected paranormal twist, and it worked nicely into the main Blood Brothers/asylum story. This was longer than the typical short play included in a Blood Brothers show, which provided a nice balance to Rogers' and Cassidy's other short pieces. I'm happy to see that some of the evening's pieces will be continued in the current episode of Bedlam Nightmares. I can't wait to see where this series goes." - Byrne Harrison, StageBuzz.
  • The Art of What You Want
    A heartbroken businessman discovers the horrifying truth about his haunted house.

    ******PRESS: "THE ART OF WHAT YOU WANT, written by Nat Cassidy and directed by Pete Boisvert, works as a graceful unveiling for the nature of the piece. Turning from Hitchcock to Almodovar it shifts the focus from the mysterious to the grotesque." - New York Theatre Review.

    "I've...
    A heartbroken businessman discovers the horrifying truth about his haunted house.

    ******PRESS: "THE ART OF WHAT YOU WANT, written by Nat Cassidy and directed by Pete Boisvert, works as a graceful unveiling for the nature of the piece. Turning from Hitchcock to Almodovar it shifts the focus from the mysterious to the grotesque." - New York Theatre Review.

    "I've seen some horrific things at the Blood Brothers' shows -- eyelids ripped off, skin peeled, human flesh consumed, rape and incest, and more forms of murder than you can shake a stick at. But when the lights went down after Nat Cassidy's short play THE ART OF WHAT YOU WANT, my first reaction was to lean over and whisper to the person sitting next to me, 'THAT was fucked up.' Nat Cassidy's play ... is easily one of the creepiest of I've ever seen. ... Featuring the best (and most upsetting) surprise ending I've seen in a while, THE ART OF WHAT YOU WANT sets a very high bar." -
    StageBuzz.

    "Cassidy’s THE ART OF WHAT YOU WANT, directed by Boisvert, is the most genuinely frightening of the evening’s offerings: a haunted house story with a ghastly twist." - Theatre is Easy.
  • Charon
    A 20 minute opera about the weary boatman of the River Styx, and how his job changes after the world ends. Commissioned by The Kennedy Center/Washington National Opera. Written with composer Scott Perkins and inspired by the story fragment by Lord Dunsany.

    ******PRESS:
    "Charon was the strongest [work of the evening]. Cassidy's libretto is spare and telling, and gave his partner...
    A 20 minute opera about the weary boatman of the River Styx, and how his job changes after the world ends. Commissioned by The Kennedy Center/Washington National Opera. Written with composer Scott Perkins and inspired by the story fragment by Lord Dunsany.

    ******PRESS:
    "Charon was the strongest [work of the evening]. Cassidy's libretto is spare and telling, and gave his partner repetitive and clear material for musical treatment. The piece works effectively because it establishes and maintains a single mood, intensifying to a dramatic conclusion." - Philip Kennicott, The Washington Post.

    “Perkins’ and Cassidy’s Charon was, as Monty Python might have put it, 'something completely different.' ... Perhaps the most remarkable thing about Charon was the free-flowing imagination of librettist Nat Cassidy ... Mr. Cassidy grabbed [Lord Dunsany's] idea and ran with it in his libretto, gradually revealing the growing horde of souls—by implication and suggestion—is actually the mass casualty of a human Armageddon. ... It’s a brief, intense setting for this quietly apocalyptic libretto that expands in a truly unsettling way the idea-kernel that Mr. Cassidy brilliantly extracted from Dunsany’s fictional speculation. ... Mr. Cassidy’s libretto is what any composer could want: a good, tight story; a compelling major character; a text loaded with rhythmic metrics, sing-able vowels; and the whole driven with choruses in a 'dies irae' funereal chant style, perfectly orchestrated by Mr. Perkins. The sum of its many parts provides a haunting atmosphere for the composer’s haunting music. ... In Charon, both the composer and librettist have an uncanny ability to [do] what a great composer like Verdi once did and what so many modern classical composers fail to do—make a visceral connection to their own times. And that’s what makes Charon a remarkable and welcome musical surprise." - Terry Ponick, The Washington Times.

    “Of the three presented, only one stood out and that was Charon. The libretto about the weary boatman ferrying newly deceased to Hades and the richly textured percussive music made the entire evening worth dashing from DC's Union Station.” - Karen LaLonde Alenier, The Dressing.

    “The best effort of the night [was] Charon, with music by Scott Perkins and libretto by Nat Cassidy. ... With its echoes of Sartre's Huis clos (‘L'enfer, c'est les autres’), juxtaposition of grim humor and hellscape, and the most evocative use of the limited instrumentation by a long shot, it was a work not without shortcomings but which I would gladly hear again and take the chance to study the score.” - Charles T. Downey, Ion Arts.
  • Roosterbrood
    A bullied teen in the 1980s tries to find vengeance with a cassette tape, a Walkman, and a mysterious song called a "roosterbrood," which supposedly causes the listener to commit suicide.
  • Generation
    In the near future, a mass mutation is discovered in the next generation of soon-to-be-born children, and all expectant mothers are given a one-on-one debriefing of what they can expect if they choose to go through with their pregnancy.
  • Phases
    Two depressed and lonely Atlantic City security guards are learning just how far their city has gone to the dogs.
  • The Unluckiest Girl
    Her name was Donna and she thought she was the unluckiest girl in the Pacific Northwest. Meeting Ted Bundy proved her right.
  • COME
    A small group of high school misfits band together to solve the mystery of why some of their classmates are dying. All roads lead to an urban legend about a student, her teacher, a video, and a monster who finds you when you're at your most vulnerable.
  • Joy Junction
    The star of a public access religious children's show unveils his newest act to a horrified co-star. Very loosely based on a true story.

    ******PRESS: "Remarkably creepy ... Resonantly disturbing ... Nat Cassidy's Joy Junction is a highlight." – Maria Micheles, nytheatre.com.

    “The night’s most rewarding [pieces] come from the playwright Nat Cassidy, with the...
    The star of a public access religious children's show unveils his newest act to a horrified co-star. Very loosely based on a true story.

    ******PRESS: "Remarkably creepy ... Resonantly disturbing ... Nat Cassidy's Joy Junction is a highlight." – Maria Micheles, nytheatre.com.

    “The night’s most rewarding [pieces] come from the playwright Nat Cassidy, with the sung-notspoken-word TALHOTBLOND, and JOY JUNCTION.” – Adam McGovern, Tor.com.

    “Cassidy's JOY JUNCTION is amazingly creepy.” – Byrne Harrison, StageBuzz.

    "My favorite of the plays was JOY JUNCTION, a story about a man and his puppet. It was disturbing, haunting and utterly revolting, the highlight of the evening. I won’t go into detail about what the puppet actually is, but it reminded me of something I once thought of after consuming a large meal and an entire bottle of scotch." - Stage Buddy.

    "JOY JUNCTION, written by Nat Cassidy and directed by Stephanie Cox Williams, is perhaps the most B Movie of the evening’s presentations. With comically gruesome sound effects, by Patrick Shearer, and surrealistically unbelievable plot, this piece accomplishes gross out horror with minimal presentation and gleeful energy." - New York Theatre Review.

    "JOY JUNCTION ... is a short, disturbing sketch [which] take[s] the creep-factor over the edge." - Theatre is Easy.
  • Economy
    Quinn, a tech genius with an algorithm that could change the way search engines affect our lives, is approached by a staggeringly wealthy old college friend, Riley, to see if Quinn would like to change the world.