Matthew Macca

Matthew Macca

Matthew Macca is a playwright/actor originally from central Connecticut. His plays have been produced at Edinburgh Fringe Festival, The Boston Theater Marathon, Boston University, Playhouse on Park, Touch Me Philly, and workshopped at the Kennedy Center. He seeks to create relevant theater that inspires change, progress, and dialogue.

His newest play To Teach a Mockingbird, is about a racially...
Matthew Macca is a playwright/actor originally from central Connecticut. His plays have been produced at Edinburgh Fringe Festival, The Boston Theater Marathon, Boston University, Playhouse on Park, Touch Me Philly, and workshopped at the Kennedy Center. He seeks to create relevant theater that inspires change, progress, and dialogue.

His newest play To Teach a Mockingbird, is about a racially diverse public high school with a mostly white teaching staff. While teaching To Kill A Mockingbird, two teachers discover the secret prejudices of their colleagues, the price of complacency, and where their good intentions aren't enough. It was recently workshopped at the Kennedy Center in DC.

In the summer of 2013, Matthew's play Pandora's Box was performed at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Pandora's Box explores America's gun laws, obsession with fame, and the role of the individual when tragedy occurs through Greek Mythology.

While studying acting at BU's College of Fine Arts Matthew performed in many productions including his self-written solo show Mouth Open Eyes Closed, which explored rape culture and sexual harassment on college campuses. Matthew later adapted the show into a short film of the same name. His short play Who is Jack explored similar themes, and was performed at Touch Me Philly's Reasonable Fear Festival.


BFA in Acting from Boston University

Plays

  • To Teach a Mockingbird
    When students witness a racially charged incident between her and a white teacher, Alyssa must learn how to advocate for students of color without endangering relationships with her white colleagues. Meanwhile, in order to keep up with the curriculum there is no time to acknowledge how relevant To Kill a Mockingbird's racial injustice still relates to modern day New England.