David Carkeet

David Carkeet

I am the author of six comic novels, three about a linguist, one about baseball, one about Vermont, and one about Mark Twain. I have written three dozen or so essays for small and large publications, again several of them about Mark Twain. One of my linguistic novels, "The Full Catastrophe," was adapted by Michael Weller, and it premiered in July 2015 at the Contemporary American Theater Festival in...
I am the author of six comic novels, three about a linguist, one about baseball, one about Vermont, and one about Mark Twain. I have written three dozen or so essays for small and large publications, again several of them about Mark Twain. One of my linguistic novels, "The Full Catastrophe," was adapted by Michael Weller, and it premiered in July 2015 at the Contemporary American Theater Festival in Shepherdstown, West Virginia. More info at davidcarkeet.com. Contact: davidcarkeet@hotmail.com. For information about my adaptations of Twain stories for the stage, please read the "Artistic Statement" on this site: https://newplayexchange.org/users/8566/david-carkeet/artistic-statement

Plays

  • Seven by Twain: Plays from the Short Stories of Mark Twain
    These are stage adaptations of classic works by Mark Twain that can be performed together as a full-length anthology or individually or in any combination. The plays run 10-12 minutes and are based on these originals: "The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm," "Buck Fanshaw's Funeral," "Cannibalism in the Cars," "The Facts Concerning the Recent Carnival of Crime in...
    These are stage adaptations of classic works by Mark Twain that can be performed together as a full-length anthology or individually or in any combination. The plays run 10-12 minutes and are based on these originals: "The McWilliamses and the Burglar Alarm," "Buck Fanshaw's Funeral," "Cannibalism in the Cars," "The Facts Concerning the Recent Carnival of Crime in Connecticut," "Extracts from Adam's Diary," "Meisterschaft," and "What Is Man?" The plays, all comedies, show a range of Twain's work from his boisterous Nevada days through his Hartford domestic period to the more explicit gloom of the later years. Most are close adaptations, while a few are more free, with changes of gender or time period from the originals. All adhere to the story line, character development, and theme of the originals. The cast sizes range from 2 to 8. A programming option instead of all of these short plays is a selection from them as Act I, and, as Act II, my 50- to 60-minute adaptation of "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" (see the entry under that title for more information); this was the program for the Nov. 30, 2016, staged reading at the Mark Twain House and Museum in Hartford. Author info and full production history of the works at davidcarkeet.com. Contact: davidcarkeet@hotmail.com.
  • The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg, by Mark Twain
    Hadleyburg, a village famous for its honesty, gets a surprising economic stimulus when a sack of gold worth forty thousand dollars is mysteriously delivered to the house of a prominent citizen, along with instructions for tracking down the man who deserves it based on a specific incident in the past. But the entire project is a sham, concocted by the man who delivered the sack because the town offended him...
    Hadleyburg, a village famous for its honesty, gets a surprising economic stimulus when a sack of gold worth forty thousand dollars is mysteriously delivered to the house of a prominent citizen, along with instructions for tracking down the man who deserves it based on a specific incident in the past. But the entire project is a sham, concocted by the man who delivered the sack because the town offended him years earlier. Through a series of clever manipulations, this man lays a trap for Hadleyburg’s prominent citizens, and their dishonesty is exposed in a climactic town meeting. The play is a close adaptation of a Mark Twain short story of the same title (1899). The cast size is 12, with doubling, 11 (4 females, 7 males). The play runs 50-60 minutes and can stand alone or combine with other short adaptations for a two-act evening of Mark Twain (see the entry "Seven by Twain" for a description of these other plays, each running at about 10 minutes). Author info at davidcarkeet.com. Contact: davidcarkeet@hotmail.com.