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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Doug DeVita:
    7 Jun. 2021
    Darkly atmospheric, rich in period detail, and intensely gripping from its first lines, by telling Nellie Bly’s story through the eyes and point of view of Anne Neville, an inmate in a mental institution, Mark Loewenstern creates an immediacy and sense of horror that creeps up on you and is hard to shake long after having read the play. Dynamite roles for women help make this an excellent, provocative work, and one I’d love to see staged.
  • Jerry Polner:
    10 May. 2021
    In this shattering dramatization, reporter Nellie Bly goes undercover to expose the cruel mistreatment of women at the insane asylum on Blackwell’s Island, New York City in 1887. Nellie befriends a woman named Anne, who is worn down but wrongly committed and has no one left to save her. The story of the asylum is told through Anne’s eyes – how every working woman is just one job, one accident, or one marriage away from being branded insane and locked away forever. Near Nellie Bly is a brutal, beautifully written shot of truth.
  • Duncan Pflaster:
    22 Oct. 2020
    A moving and interesting adaptation of Nellie Bly's story, Loewenstern delves deeply into proto-feminist ideas and notions and not only tells the story of Nellie's investigation into Blackwell's Island Insane Asylum, also draws a vivid picture of the abuses perpetrated upon those women incarcerated there.
  • Jennifer O'Grady:
    11 Jan. 2020
    Terrific, theatrical play about a forgotten woman and a famous one. I would love to see this staged.
  • Rich Rubin:
    16 Sep. 2019
    A bold and thrilling work of theater -- multilayered, cinematic and extremely powerful. In addition to presenting the fascinating, nineteenth century story of Anne Neville and Nellie Bly, the play's time-shifting structure touches on both the distant past and the distant future. It's a wild ride, but we know from the start that we're in the hands of a master playwright. Highly recommended!
  • Scott Sickles:
    11 Oct. 2018
    The choice to tell the tale of Nelly Bly's stay in an Blackwell's from the point of view of another patient somehow gives the story even more power. Anne Neville is not a well woman: fragile, possibly delusional, trapped, and enraged, we truly get the sense of the hell the mentally ill endure from both their afflictions and their so called treatment. It's a tour de force role in a striking and daringly imaginative play.