Mona Deutsch Miller

Mona Deutsch Miller

Mona Deutsch Miller, an award-winning playwright, has been writing since childhood. Member of the Dramatists Guild, ALAP and LAFPI. She is a graduate of Stanford Law School and practices law. She was born in Florida, grew up in Manhattan, and has lived in Los Angeles long enough to qualify as an Angeleno. Eight of her plays have been produced in the Los Angeles area. She studied play writing with Lisa...
Mona Deutsch Miller, an award-winning playwright, has been writing since childhood. Member of the Dramatists Guild, ALAP and LAFPI. She is a graduate of Stanford Law School and practices law. She was born in Florida, grew up in Manhattan, and has lived in Los Angeles long enough to qualify as an Angeleno. Eight of her plays have been produced in the Los Angeles area. She studied play writing with Lisa Soland, Susan Merson and Leon Martell, among others. She writes in multiple genres, including comedy, black comedy, drama, youth plays and historical plays. Her play, Strangers on a Train, has been published, as have some of her monologues. She was with Fierce Backbone for almost 9 years, including as Head of the Writers Unit. Her colleagues reported that her feedback and dramaturgical advice were excellent, insightful and helpful. She loves classical music, sunshine and movies. She has also written several screenplays, an original TV pilot and spec scripts for "Northern Exposure" and "Monk." She's fluent in French and rusty in Russian.

Plays

  • Kiss My Axe: The Norwegian Games
    This is a ten-minute comedy where a couple arriving at a modern hotel in Norway for a holiday touches a Viking axe on display in the lobby and ends up in the 11th century, together with a real Viking. He wants to take the wife back to his cave. She thinks he's part of the entertainment the hotel provides. From off stage, male and female voices first suggest competitive athletic games and later a terrible...
    This is a ten-minute comedy where a couple arriving at a modern hotel in Norway for a holiday touches a Viking axe on display in the lobby and ends up in the 11th century, together with a real Viking. He wants to take the wife back to his cave. She thinks he's part of the entertainment the hotel provides. From off stage, male and female voices first suggest competitive athletic games and later a terrible battle. The husband, initially tethered to his I-phone, intervenes and protects his wife from 11th century boorish behavior (like rape).
  • Abram and Sarai: My Sister, My Wife
    In this short play inspired by the Biblical story in which Abram (the future patriarch Abraham) passes his wife Sarai (later Sarah) off as his sister, to avoid attacks while in Egypt, I have retold the tale with a feminist point of view and set it in present-day Brooklyn. Sarai doesn't want to be treated like a piece of meat. Abram has to confront what it really means when an Egyptian prince "takes...
    In this short play inspired by the Biblical story in which Abram (the future patriarch Abraham) passes his wife Sarai (later Sarah) off as his sister, to avoid attacks while in Egypt, I have retold the tale with a feminist point of view and set it in present-day Brooklyn. Sarai doesn't want to be treated like a piece of meat. Abram has to confront what it really means when an Egyptian prince "takes" Sarai. God speaks (from off stage) at the beginning, so everyone will know the original verse.
  • The Lunch Break
    In this 10-minute play, a sexually-starved woman approaches a work friend during his lunch break seeking sexual gratification in the future. She learns he's gay. Their friendship develops.
  • Library Research
    This is a 10-minute play that advocates for freedom from surveillance, in which a young writer approaches an older, savvy librarian. He wants to do research for his play; she tries to subtly educate him in the dangers of telling her too much.
  • The Photograph
    A man (Indian or Pakistani) and a woman (any race), now 20 years older, look back at their younger, less inhibited, freer selves on stage. The younger players cannot hear the wiser, older, more jaded pair.
  • Emily Confides
    In this short play, the great American poet, Emily Dickinson, introduces herself using her own poetry. There are two great, challenging roles, for Emily, who ages throughout the play, and the Gentleman Caller, who also becomes Death. Simple set.
  • Receipts
    A short sex comedy, where an infuriated, sex-starved wife rushes home from a business trip (that may have involved some hanky panky) in response to a text from her super-organized, meticulous husband.
  • The End of the World Conference
    In this sendup of company meetings, a corporate group meets at their annual end of the world conference, only this time, it's not a drill. They discover that some of them are not what they thought at all.
  • The Box in the Park
    A couple encounters a strange box as they go for a walk in the park. The woman is eager to explore; the man is cautious, thinking it's a surveillance device. They reveal their thinking about relationships, communication, and politics as they argue about approaching the box. The box emits sounds at certain critical moments, which may be done by a planned device triggered at appropriate times by a stage...
    A couple encounters a strange box as they go for a walk in the park. The woman is eager to explore; the man is cautious, thinking it's a surveillance device. They reveal their thinking about relationships, communication, and politics as they argue about approaching the box. The box emits sounds at certain critical moments, which may be done by a planned device triggered at appropriate times by a stage manager, or by a third actor of either gender.
  • Swept Ashore
    An 18th century pirate finds himself drenched, starving, thirsty and alone on the beach with a young, disgruntled gay fashion designer from contemporary times. They disagree about everything. The pirate doesn't get the "fancy boy's" lingo; the designer is trying to decide if his life is a play or a movie, among other things.
  • No Ingles, Can Dance
    In this ten minute comedy, a petite, feisty Hispanic immigrant with a very heavy Cuban (or other Hispanic) accent attempts to dance her way into the heart of her shy ESL teacher, an impoverished poet.
  • Strangers on a Train
    In this 10-minute, British style black comedy, a young man, bent on committing suicide, meets a strange woman on the train, who scares him out of it.
  • I'Rock Around the Campfire
    A slightly wacky 15-minute comedy for 4 men and an imposing offstage voice about peace in the Middle East. The Biblical prophet Abraham finds himself alone in the desert, when out of the blue a contemporary terrorist, a secular Iraqi, and an ancient Babylonian tumble on to the stage. As they sort out which Gods they worship, and puzzle over tiny Israel on a map that drops from the rafters (with conflict over...
    A slightly wacky 15-minute comedy for 4 men and an imposing offstage voice about peace in the Middle East. The Biblical prophet Abraham finds himself alone in the desert, when out of the blue a contemporary terrorist, a secular Iraqi, and an ancient Babylonian tumble on to the stage. As they sort out which Gods they worship, and puzzle over tiny Israel on a map that drops from the rafters (with conflict over the Great Satan, the Little Satan, and the Jews) they learn they have some things in common. The Voice of God frequently admonishes all of them.