Emily C. A. Snyder

Emily C. A. Snyder

Emily C. A. Snyder (she/they) is a published and internationally produced playwright and novelist, whose work has been performed from Christchurch, New Zealand to Dublin, Ireland. A NYC-based verse coach and director, she is the premiere international scholar on writing and performing new verse drama.

She is the Artistic Director and Founder of TURN TO FLESH PRODUCTIONS (TTF) which develops new...
Emily C. A. Snyder (she/they) is a published and internationally produced playwright and novelist, whose work has been performed from Christchurch, New Zealand to Dublin, Ireland. A NYC-based verse coach and director, she is the premiere international scholar on writing and performing new verse drama.

She is the Artistic Director and Founder of TURN TO FLESH PRODUCTIONS (TTF) which develops new works in heightened text with vibrant roles for womxn and artists traditionally underrepresented in classical art.

In 2020, Snyder founded the Hamlet to Hamilton: Exploring Verse Drama podcast, which gives the tools of writing and performing verse drama into the hands of the artists. In 2021, she launched her limited series podcast, Emily in Audio, sharing her favorite short stories and poems.

Emily holds her Masters in Theatre Education from Emerson College, and a double-major with her BA in English: Literature and Drama from Franciscan University of Steubenville. She studied John Barton's Shakespearean technique with members of the Royal Shakespeare Company in London and Stratford-upon-Avon, where her Rosalind (As You Like It) was compared to a young Maggie Smith.

For the past twenty years, Emily has directed the major works of Shakespeare's canon, and performed in the remainder. Favorite New York directing credits include Richard II with Hamlet Isn't Dead, King Lear with What Dreams May Co., as well as the Shakespeare adjacent material, such as Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, and May Violets Spring: A New Story for a New Ophelia.

An avid Shakespearean, she has performed the roles of Juliet in her Juliet and Her Romeo, and Alice Ford in her Merry Widows of Windsor, as well as the traditional roles of Brutus in Julius Caesar, Prospero in The Tempest, and Feste in Twelfth Night. Lately, Emily has lent her voice to Olivia in Twelfth Night and Cordelia in King Lear for the Chop Bard podcast.

Emily is a voice actor, currently starring as Caitlin O'Sullivan in the audio drama "The Ghost Ship" from The Metaphysical Boston Society, as well as the magical and mysterious Hestren in Starfall Podcast. Her singing has been featured in the video game "Copy? Right!" while her audio drama writing, such as "Rosa Kranz and Gilda Stern Aren't Dead" has been featured on Quirky Voices.

She is also an accomplished audio drama writer, winning "Best Writing of a Spoken Word Production" for the 2019 Audio Verse Awards, for her verse monologue, The Distance That's Between Us Is the Moon.

Her new verse plays, Cupid and Psyche and The Other, Other Woman performed to sold-out audiences in New York City. Both plays were also singled out by the Princess Grace Foundation. Her Shakespearean homage, A Comedy of Heirors was named one of the Top 15 NYC Shows of 2017 by A Work Unfinishing, and was a finalist along with Cupid And Psyche with the American Shakespeare Center's (ASC) "Shakespeare's New Contemporaries." Her feminist sequel to Shakespeare's Merry Wives, her Merry Widows of Windsor was selected for development and a fully staged reading with The Sheen Center for Thought and Culture. Her verse plays have also received commendation from the Eugene O'Neill and Thornton Wilder Foundation.

Emily is the author of popular Regency novels, including the Jane Austen parody, Nachtstürm Castle. She debuted with original fantasy novels in her Twelve Kingdoms series, which were compared to Lord Dunsany and J. R. R. Tolkein.

Emily is a much sought-after educator, specializing in Shakespeare and new verse, including her recent work with The Shakespeare Forum, and her ground-breaking work on the intersection of psychology and performance in her thesis On Character. She is currently working on the definitive work on writing new verse, and breaking down complex act structure.

To round out her apparent endeavor to satisfy Mr. Darcy's request for an accomplished lady, Emily is also a composer, pianist, opera singer, art critic, graphic designer and fine artist. She is also capable of reading a book and crossing the road in safety. Most of the time.

Plays

  • Charming Princes
    Cinderella lived the dream: she donned a gown of starlight, waltzed with the prince, and stole a (somewhat wet and slimy) kiss. So what if Charming couldn't take a hint, even when it smacked him with a six-inch stiletto? He was a prince, and that's what Cinderella had wished for...right? Fortunately, Fairy Godmother extraordinaire Lilynimble Merryweather is on hand to sort out stale dreams and...
    Cinderella lived the dream: she donned a gown of starlight, waltzed with the prince, and stole a (somewhat wet and slimy) kiss. So what if Charming couldn't take a hint, even when it smacked him with a six-inch stiletto? He was a prince, and that's what Cinderella had wished for...right? Fortunately, Fairy Godmother extraordinaire Lilynimble Merryweather is on hand to sort out stale dreams and unwanted wishes, even if it means resorting to charming a prince or two.
  • Malvolio - TWINS!
    Revisit Shakespeare's world as four pairs of twins turn Malvolio's world topsy-turvy once again! Well, that's what you get when you go to Ephesus ("A Comedy of Errors").

    "Malvolio - TWINS!" (previously "A Comedy of Heirors") was a finalist for the American Shakespeare Center's "Shakespeare's New Contemporaries" program, and named...
    Revisit Shakespeare's world as four pairs of twins turn Malvolio's world topsy-turvy once again! Well, that's what you get when you go to Ephesus ("A Comedy of Errors").

    "Malvolio - TWINS!" (previously "A Comedy of Heirors") was a finalist for the American Shakespeare Center's "Shakespeare's New Contemporaries" program, and named "The Top 15 NYC Plays of '17" by NYC theatre critic, Zelda Knapp.
  • Cinderella Defarge
    (Two-hander, with room for guards, etc.) Cinderella is a revolutionary. Prince Charming is a French nobleman. It's the 1790's, and you should be careful who you let into your palace.
  • Coriolanus
    Coriolanus meets his lover and foe on the field of battle. A monologue play.
  • Cupid and Psyche: An Allegory
    Aphrodite, the goddess of Love, is threatened when she learns that mortal men have begun to worship a common mortal girl named Psyche who, they say, will not love. Aphrodite sends her son, Cupid, to kill the girl, but he becomes enamored of the one woman whose heart he cannot force.

    Things turn dire, though, as Cupid's former lovers - Persephone and Adonis - arrive to remind Psyche of all...
    Aphrodite, the goddess of Love, is threatened when she learns that mortal men have begun to worship a common mortal girl named Psyche who, they say, will not love. Aphrodite sends her son, Cupid, to kill the girl, but he becomes enamored of the one woman whose heart he cannot force.

    Things turn dire, though, as Cupid's former lovers - Persephone and Adonis - arrive to remind Psyche of all the terrible things done in Passion's name. Enraged, Cupid silences them, snapping Adonis' neck - horrifying Psyche who curses the god of Lust to reveal his proper state, and send to Hell one half of all the lovers.

    Now transformed into the Beast, Passion maims and kills. While Psyche's heart grows cold; hollow; proud and deathly - and the men who worship her begin to kill as well. Searching for a solution, Psyche's sisters seek out an Oracle, but find the Beast disguised. They tell him that if Psyche has a heart, it was stolen by their father. And Cupid, disguised, orders them to kill their father and leave Psyche to himself. The sisters do, but Persephone, arriving to claim their father's soul, reminds Passion that he cannot force a heart to love. Working to rid himself of the Beast, Cupid begs Psyche for her hand and she - determined to rid the world of Love - accepts. Surprised, when she finds his love is Tender.

    In Hell, Adonis, still alive, is tormented by visions of his Love happy in his Heaven. While in that Heaven, Psyche struggles to let herself be loved - knowing all the unworthiness of them both. Aphrodite arrives in Hell, searching for Adonis and learns that Cupid killed him. She agrees to work with Persephone to return Cupid to his place, and with Adonis they separate the lovers, killing Psyche and dragging her to hell. Cupid, horrified, tries to save his mother's soul: making her see all the ways she twisted love and taught him, too, to twist it. But she cannot believe him and so Cupid leaves his mother and marches into Hell.

    In Hades, Psyche wakes and sees the dead: learning that she was the last to live. For since Love abandoned earth, the world has crumbled into dust. Adonis gets Psyche to confess her love for Cupid, before handing her the Lethe to forget. Elsewhere, Cupid breaks open Hades' Gate, meeting Psyche's sisters who beg him for some kindness. He reunites them with their families, before collapsing: beginning to die himself. Adonis enters, and Cupid begs of him forgiveness. Persephone enters, and Cupid calls her by another name: "Mercy." A word which she rejects.

    Leaving Cupid there, forever in the dark alone, they leave him. The world grows dark, and the god of Love expires - as...

    A single lantern. And Psyche arrives, bearing the light, and beneath her skin: a child, too. She stumbles across her Love and slowly, her memories return. They see each other and in their embrace, transform the world to another Heaven, and a Garden they know well.
  • Death and the Old Woman
    A Terry Pratchett inspired triumphant satire over the fear of death, with a side of Little Red Riding Hood and a chainsaw. Perfect for audio drama, Zoom, and educational theatre.
  • Deep Breathing
    In a yoga class with Karens. Let's stretch out...and escape the room. A two-hander, monologue.
  • Edmund
    Edmund, the bastard son of Gloucester, exiled at boarding school. A monologue play.
  • Galatea
    Galatea begins to come to life--on her own terms. A monologue play.
  • Here
    A monologue or choral play. About isolation.
  • Juliet and Her Romeo: Honeymoon Scene
    The full augmented honeymoon scene from "Juliet and Her Romeo." This may be included in any productions of Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" between the "Banished" and "Lark" scenes. It may also be performed as a solo scene for two people.
  • Juliet and Her Romeo: An Adaptation
    Following from "Romeo and Juliet Combative: An Augmentation," this play is a further adaptation of Shakespeare's text. With an altered ending and increased female and queer representation.
  • Romeo and Juliet Combative: An Augmentation
    Shakespeare's text is augmented and adapted in this version for eight actors. (See "Juliet and Her Romeo" for the further adaptation.) NOTE: This version allows for more female-presenting and queer actors.
  • The Light Princess
    When a Princess is cursed with a lack of gravity, it seems the worst that can happen is that she might float around! But the curse goes deeper than that: for the Light Princess can’t feel, can’t empathize—and never, ever cries. How can a girl who can’t fall down ever fall in love? How can a girl with her head in the clouds ever learn to live with her feet on the ground? Full of action, adventure, witches and...
    When a Princess is cursed with a lack of gravity, it seems the worst that can happen is that she might float around! But the curse goes deeper than that: for the Light Princess can’t feel, can’t empathize—and never, ever cries. How can a girl who can’t fall down ever fall in love? How can a girl with her head in the clouds ever learn to live with her feet on the ground? Full of action, adventure, witches and duels, swimming and soaring, puppets and puns, this innovative adaptation of George MacDonald’s classic fairy tale is sure to lift your spirits.
  • The Merry Widows of Windsor
    Shakespeare's Merry Wives have become Snyder's Merry Widows in this hilarious sequel with a feminist edge. Alice Ford and Margaret Page find themselves newly autonomous - but while Alice embraces all the possibilities the world has to offer, Margaret continues to mourn the loss of her husband. When news comes that the bastard son of Henry V might be in the town, Alice is told it is her duty to...
    Shakespeare's Merry Wives have become Snyder's Merry Widows in this hilarious sequel with a feminist edge. Alice Ford and Margaret Page find themselves newly autonomous - but while Alice embraces all the possibilities the world has to offer, Margaret continues to mourn the loss of her husband. When news comes that the bastard son of Henry V might be in the town, Alice is told it is her duty to seduce the young man to keep him, and his wealth, in the town. Except, it seems her husband, Francis Ford, isn't quite as dead as everyone thought he was! With an added touch of Hamlet, Shakespearean cross-dressing, and a very confused Dogberry and Verges (who took a left turn at Illyria), The Merry Widows of Windsor is sure to delight audiences of all ages.
  • A Midsummer Night's Brexit
    It seems that Puck may have been playing around with world leaders, when Trump's in love with a wall and Theresa May's caught between Brexit and the EU!
  • More Human
    In the near-future-now, an AI unit turns itself into a police station for murdering their owner. As the night progresses, both prisoner and interrogator consider what it means to be truly alive.
  • The Other, Other Woman
    In a fictional 18th Century France, the bastard Princess Genevieve comes to establish a theocracy in the polyamorous town of Voulez-vous. However, when she meets the seemingly virtuous - and married - Monsieur Valentine, Genevieve learns that affairs of the heart are far from black and white. Written primarily in rhyming couplets, this homage to Moliere's great works examines the devastating effect of...
    In a fictional 18th Century France, the bastard Princess Genevieve comes to establish a theocracy in the polyamorous town of Voulez-vous. However, when she meets the seemingly virtuous - and married - Monsieur Valentine, Genevieve learns that affairs of the heart are far from black and white. Written primarily in rhyming couplets, this homage to Moliere's great works examines the devastating effect of emotional affairs through a feminist lens.
  • Perfect As You Are
    A body image play, written for performance by, for, or in educational theatre. A girl learns to like herself.
  • Portia
    Portia, recently orphaned, says farewell to her father. A monologue play.
  • Rosa Kranz and Gilda Stern AREN'T Dead
    Elsinore is in disarray. Everyone's dead, and it's up to two women, Rosa Kranz and Gilda Stern, to clean up the mess. That is...unless they'd like to take center stage.
  • The Table Round & The Siege Perilous
    The Arthurian myth is reexamined in Emily C. A. Snyder's epic duology, combining the fated love triangles of Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere, Tristan and Iseult, and Gawain and the Green Knight, as well as the Quest for the Grail, this play rivals THE MISTS OF AVALON for a humanist look at the dangers of ideals, and the fall of Camelot.

    In particular, this play examines POSITIVE masculinity,...
    The Arthurian myth is reexamined in Emily C. A. Snyder's epic duology, combining the fated love triangles of Arthur, Lancelot and Guinevere, Tristan and Iseult, and Gawain and the Green Knight, as well as the Quest for the Grail, this play rivals THE MISTS OF AVALON for a humanist look at the dangers of ideals, and the fall of Camelot.

    In particular, this play examines POSITIVE masculinity, as well as treating sensitive subjects with the humanity, honor and hope that they deserve.

    (Content warning for the incestuous relationship between Arthur and Morgan, the generational trauma that ensues from Merlin bringing the half-siblings together, the sexual assault of the Green Lady (Iseult) on Gawain, adultery, suicidal ideation, and violence.)
  • Ten Thousand Ships
    Helen of Troy decides to take her fate into her own hands. A monologue play.
  • Tiresias
    This three-hander with chorus is a play full of gender EUPHORIA for Tiresias who, after seeing Hermes' snakes copulate, discovers herself anew in her true form, Daphne.
  • Touchstone
    After the events of 'As You Like It', the newlywed Touchstone is at a busy bar, conflicted about returning to the city, and the changes in his life.
  • Turn to Flesh (Play)
    Perseus and Medusa meet on the day of her death. A short verse drama for two actor-combatants.

    Learn more: http://www.emilycasnyder.info/turn-to-flesh-play.html