Emily C. A. Snyder

Emily C. A. Snyder

Emily C. A. Snyder is a published and internationally produced playwright and novelist, whose work has been performed from Christchurch, New Zealand to Dublin, Ireland. A NYC-based verse coach and director, she is the premiere international scholar on writing and performing new verse drama.

She is the Co-Founder and Artistic Director of TURN TO FLESH PRODUCTIONS (TTF), a New York City based...
Emily C. A. Snyder is a published and internationally produced playwright and novelist, whose work has been performed from Christchurch, New Zealand to Dublin, Ireland. A NYC-based verse coach and director, she is the premiere international scholar on writing and performing new verse drama.

She is the Co-Founder and Artistic Director of TURN TO FLESH PRODUCTIONS (TTF), a New York City based theatre company specializing in developing new plays with modern themes written in classical styles, with an interest in creating vibrant new roles for women on-stage and off. Snyder is also the Founder of Gaudete Academy ("Gaudete" is Latin for "Rejoice!"), which produces plays that are true, good, beautiful...and giddy.

Emily is the author of the Twelve Kingdoms Series, which includes Niamh and the Hermit ~ A Fairy Tale, and Charming the Moon. Her work has been compared to C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkein, and Alfred, Lord Dunsany. She is also the author of the Jane Austen parody-homages, Nachtstürm Castle - A Gothic Austen Novel, and Letters of Love & Deception. Currently, she is working The Sable Valentine, an epistolary mystery series, described as "The Scarlet Pimpernel...with magic."

For the past fifteen years, Emily has directed the major works of Shakespeare's canon (Richard II, King Lear), and Shakespeare-adjacent comedies and dramas (Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, May Violets Spring) in New York City, as well as the greater Boston area (Hamlet, Macbeth, Romeo and Juliet, The Tempest, and A Midsummer Night's Dream twice, among others).

For Valentine's Day 2014, her five-act iambic pentameter play, Cupid and Psyche premiered at The Barrow Group Theatre in New York City to sold-out audiences. The full Love and Death Trilogy (Persephone Rises, The Seduction of Adonis, and Cupid and Psyche) is currently in development with TURN TO FLESH PRODUCTIONS.

Emily holds her Masters in Theatre Education from Emerson College, and a double-major with her BA in English: Literature and Drama from Franciscan University of Steubenville. She studied John Barton's Shakespearean technique with members of the Royal Shakespeare Company in London and Stratford-upon-Avon, where her Rosalind (As You Like It) was compared to a young Maggie Smith.

Despite her biography, she is not overly fond of cats.

Plays

  • Cupid and Psyche: An Allegory
    Aphrodite, the goddess of Love, is threatened when she learns that mortal men have begun to worship a common mortal girl named Psyche who, they say, will not love. Aphrodite sends her son, Cupid, to kill the girl, but he becomes enamored of the one woman whose heart he cannot force.

    Things turn dire, though, as Cupid's former lovers - Persephone and Adonis - arrive to remind Psyche of all...
    Aphrodite, the goddess of Love, is threatened when she learns that mortal men have begun to worship a common mortal girl named Psyche who, they say, will not love. Aphrodite sends her son, Cupid, to kill the girl, but he becomes enamored of the one woman whose heart he cannot force.

    Things turn dire, though, as Cupid's former lovers - Persephone and Adonis - arrive to remind Psyche of all the terrible things done in Passion's name. Enraged, Cupid silences them, snapping Adonis' neck - horrifying Psyche who curses the god of Lust to reveal his proper state, and send to Hell one half of all the lovers.

    Now transformed into the Beast, Passion maims and kills. While Psyche's heart grows cold; hollow; proud and deathly - and the men who worship her begin to kill as well. Searching for a solution, Psyche's sisters seek out an Oracle, but find the Beast disguised. They tell him that if Psyche has a heart, it was stolen by their father. And Cupid, disguised, orders them to kill their father and leave Psyche to himself. The sisters do, but Persephone, arriving to claim their father's soul, reminds Passion that he cannot force a heart to love. Working to rid himself of the Beast, Cupid begs Psyche for her hand and she - determined to rid the world of Love - accepts. Surprised, when she finds his love is Tender.

    In Hell, Adonis, still alive, is tormented by visions of his Love happy in his Heaven. While in that Heaven, Psyche struggles to let herself be loved - knowing all the unworthiness of them both. Aphrodite arrives in Hell, searching for Adonis and learns that Cupid killed him. She agrees to work with Persephone to return Cupid to his place, and with Adonis they separate the lovers, killing Psyche and dragging her to hell. Cupid, horrified, tries to save his mother's soul: making her see all the ways she twisted love and taught him, too, to twist it. But she cannot believe him and so Cupid leaves his mother and marches into Hell.

    In Hades, Psyche wakes and sees the dead: learning that she was the last to live. For since Love abandoned earth, the world has crumbled into dust. Adonis gets Psyche to confess her love for Cupid, before handing her the Lethe to forget. Elsewhere, Cupid breaks open Hades' Gate, meeting Psyche's sisters who beg him for some kindness. He reunites them with their families, before collapsing: beginning to die himself. Adonis enters, and Cupid begs of him forgiveness. Persephone enters, and Cupid calls her by another name: "Mercy." A word which she rejects.

    Leaving Cupid there, forever in the dark alone, they leave him. The world grows dark, and the god of Love expires - as...

    A single lantern. And Psyche arrives, bearing the light, and beneath her skin: a child, too. She stumbles across her Love and slowly, her memories return. They see each other and in their embrace, transform the world to another Heaven, and a Garden they know well.
  • The Merry Widows of Windsor
    Shakespeare's Merry Wives have become Snyder's Merry Widows in this hilarious sequel with a feminist edge. Alice Ford and Margaret Page find themselves newly autonomous - but while Alice embraces all the possibilities the world has to offer, Margaret continues to mourn the loss of her husband. When news comes that the bastard son of Henry V might be in the town, Alice is told it is her duty to...
    Shakespeare's Merry Wives have become Snyder's Merry Widows in this hilarious sequel with a feminist edge. Alice Ford and Margaret Page find themselves newly autonomous - but while Alice embraces all the possibilities the world has to offer, Margaret continues to mourn the loss of her husband. When news comes that the bastard son of Henry V might be in the town, Alice is told it is her duty to seduce the young man to keep him, and his wealth, in the town. Except, it seems her husband, Francis Ford, isn't quite as dead as everyone thought he was! With an added touch of Hamlet, Shakespearean cross-dressing, and a very confused Dogberry and Verges (who took a left turn at Illyria), The Merry Widows of Windsor is sure to delight audiences of all ages.
  • A Comedy of Heirors
    With twice the women, twice the twins, and Malvolio running after everyone, A Comedy of Heirors is the feminist answer to Shakespeare's farcical romp through Ephesus. Including characters from several of Shakespeare's plays, cross-dressing, mistaken identities, and our favorite constables, Dogberry and Verges, A Comedy of Heirors has been called "Shakespearean Disneyland."
  • Charming Princes
    Cinderella lived the dream: she donned a gown of starlight, waltzed with the prince, and stole a (somewhat wet and slimy) kiss. So what if Charming couldn't take a hint, even when it smacked him with a six-inch stiletto? He was a prince, and that's what Cinderella had wished for...right? Fortunately, Fairy Godmother extraordinaire Lilynimble Merryweather is on hand to sort out stale dreams and...
    Cinderella lived the dream: she donned a gown of starlight, waltzed with the prince, and stole a (somewhat wet and slimy) kiss. So what if Charming couldn't take a hint, even when it smacked him with a six-inch stiletto? He was a prince, and that's what Cinderella had wished for...right? Fortunately, Fairy Godmother extraordinaire Lilynimble Merryweather is on hand to sort out stale dreams and unwanted wishes, even if it means resorting to charming a prince or two.
  • The Light Princess
    When a Princess is cursed with a lack of gravity, it seems the worst that can happen is that she might float around! But the curse goes deeper than that: for the Light Princess can’t feel, can’t empathize—and never, ever cries. How can a girl who can’t fall down ever fall in love? How can a girl with her head in the clouds ever learn to live with her feet on the ground? Full of action, adventure, witches and...
    When a Princess is cursed with a lack of gravity, it seems the worst that can happen is that she might float around! But the curse goes deeper than that: for the Light Princess can’t feel, can’t empathize—and never, ever cries. How can a girl who can’t fall down ever fall in love? How can a girl with her head in the clouds ever learn to live with her feet on the ground? Full of action, adventure, witches and duels, swimming and soaring, puppets and puns, this innovative adaptation of George MacDonald’s classic fairy tale is sure to lift your spirits.