Artistic Statement

Artistic Statement

My plays examine the challenges and contradictions inherent to being a woman in the 21st century. Much of my work is rooted in a sort of horror of conventional domesticity. We live in a world where women have existed within very circumscribed roles, and the traditional path of marriage and babies has always seemed incredibly stifling to me. Some of my plays feature women who are trapped within these traditional expectations, struggling to break free and find a way to be happy despite the social pressures they’ve internalized. Other plays subvert traditional social expectations or blow them apart entirely. I’ve written a romantic comedy where the romantic lead was a pedophile; a play about wanting a baby where the baby was actually a machine gun; a play about the mother-daughter relationship where the mother ended up getting eaten by a minotaur. I think the through line of all of my plays is that they examine women’s roles in our society, and question whether the traditional happy ending – marriage and babies – is actually a happy ending after all.

I’m happily married, by the way, and I’m probably going to have a baby at some point – so when I say question, I don’t necessarily mean reject. We’re living at a time when the world is constantly changing – probably faster than ever before - and we genuinely have a chance to remake our society. And so it’s worth asking whether our traditional structures and assumptions are actually serving us – particularly women, and people of color, and the others among us whose voices weren’t heard when those structures and assumptions were created. I think theater is uniquely suited to this work of questioning the world we have and examining alternate versions of it, since every time we write a play we are literally creating a world onstage. So I want to use the theater to examine the ways that the world teaches us to be women, and explore whether there are ways that might work better and make us happier than the ways we’ve been given.