Valetta Anderson

Valetta Anderson

Valetta’s live stageplays include “Hallelujah Street Blues,” produced by Atlanta’s Horizon Theatre, “The Match” commissioned and produced by Kennesaw State University, “Leaving Limbo” produced as part of POWER PLAYS, Essential Theatre Festival, “Today” (AT&T:Onstage Award) and “She’ll Find Her Way Home” by Atlanta’s Jomandi Productions, Pittsburgh’s Kuntu Repertory Theatre and Nashville’s Fisk University...
Valetta’s live stageplays include “Hallelujah Street Blues,” produced by Atlanta’s Horizon Theatre, “The Match” commissioned and produced by Kennesaw State University, “Leaving Limbo” produced as part of POWER PLAYS, Essential Theatre Festival, “Today” (AT&T:Onstage Award) and “She’ll Find Her Way Home” by Atlanta’s Jomandi Productions, Pittsburgh’s Kuntu Repertory Theatre and Nashville’s Fisk University and also available at Blue Moon Plays. “Traveling Thomas” and “Medusa In You” are in development. “Toni” is her first screenwriting credit and can be viewed at no cost to Amazon Prime Members.

Valetta is currently a member of Actors and Playwrights Collaborative and the Contemporary Club both in Cincinnati, Ohio, Working Title Playwrights in Atlanta Georgia and the Dramatists Guild. Formerly she has served on the Boards of Directors of Decatur Arts Alliance, Georgia Assembly of Community Arts Agencies and Working Title Playwrights. She was Executive Director of DeKalb Council for the Arts and was Resident Teaching Artist at the Alliance Theatre Institute for Educators and Teaching Artists. She was Teaching Artist with Atlanta’s Fox and Horizon Theatres and Adjunct Professor of Playwriting at Spelman College.

Plays

  • The Moral Of The Story
    Why does Harry Hare, television spokes-hare for the National Hare Council on Carrots, race his longtime friend, Tommy Tortoise? Why can’t Harry’s niece, Harriet Hare spell carrot? This modernized children’s play also reveals the ancient Ibo (northern Nigeria) reason that tortoises have cracked, lumpy shells. This is a comedy in one-act play revealing much that inquiring young minds have always wanted to know –...
    Why does Harry Hare, television spokes-hare for the National Hare Council on Carrots, race his longtime friend, Tommy Tortoise? Why can’t Harry’s niece, Harriet Hare spell carrot? This modernized children’s play also reveals the ancient Ibo (northern Nigeria) reason that tortoises have cracked, lumpy shells. This is a comedy in one-act play revealing much that inquiring young minds have always wanted to know – an inside scoop on Aesop’s most famous Fable.
  • She'll Find Her Way Home
    This full-length drama tells the story of the only child of a wealthy though deceased Mississippi slaveholder. Martha Robb views her coming of age with the expectations of adolescent longings and the seemingly unending horizons promised by the victorious Union Army and her quadroon complexion. She and her lifelong and as fair complexioned friend, Thomas, could forge new lives for themselves, lives without...
    This full-length drama tells the story of the only child of a wealthy though deceased Mississippi slaveholder. Martha Robb views her coming of age with the expectations of adolescent longings and the seemingly unending horizons promised by the victorious Union Army and her quadroon complexion. She and her lifelong and as fair complexioned friend, Thomas, could forge new lives for themselves, lives without barriers… if they could only get past her mother, Gussie, who will not be swayed. Isaiah Montgomery, Vicksburg’s newest, wealthiest, coal-black complexioned store owner, is more than welcome to come courting her daughter. “She’ll Find Her Way Home” is a fictionalized account of the courtship of Martha and Isaiah Montgomery, the historical founders of the African-American town of Mound Bayou, Mississippi.

    “Like August Wilson’s scenes of blacks at home and at leisure, these moments have the natural, artless flow of life itself. And below the easygoing horseplay, the historical context creates an undertow of suspense, for these are the lonely advance scouts on a perilous journey from slavery into an alien white world.” (Dan Hulbert, Theater Critic, The Atlanta Journal and Constitution, February 6, 1991. )

    “Jomandi Productions’ “She’ll Find Her Way Home” Hits Home… Anderson fingers something vitally important that all too often gets overlooked, pushed aside, –benignly censored from African American theater. Hats off to her for writing a love story about how an African American man and woman are able to work through difficulties, and learn to trust each other.” (Angela E. Chamblee, Theater Review, The Atlanta Voice, February 16, 1991.)