Matthew Doherty

Matthew Doherty

Matthew Doherty was born and raised in the Chicagoland area, in a good, Irish-American family, which meant three boys, lots of Hail Marys, and a helluva lot of trouble. At ten, he got a wild hair to audition for movies - and though he didn’t get that first part after doing a cartwheel, badly, in front of Garry Marshall, he was told, “you should get an agent, kid”. So he did. He soon got cast in the Mighty Ducks...
Matthew Doherty was born and raised in the Chicagoland area, in a good, Irish-American family, which meant three boys, lots of Hail Marys, and a helluva lot of trouble. At ten, he got a wild hair to audition for movies - and though he didn’t get that first part after doing a cartwheel, badly, in front of Garry Marshall, he was told, “you should get an agent, kid”. So he did. He soon got cast in the Mighty Ducks franchise as Les/Dave Averman, and then as Heed on So I Married an Axe-Murderer - which changed everything. Matthew experienced all the absurdity and pitfalls of being a child star, before stepping away as a teenager to go to Northwestern and study writing - which may have saved his life.


He now lives in Los Angeles, hunkering down in quarantine with his partner/unofficial-dramaturg as the world turns inside out. A finger-style folk guitarist, lifetime member of The Actor’s Studio and veteran actor of stage, screen, and TV, Matthew now focuses almost exclusively on writing, and has a particular gift for absurd tragicomedies that expose the ridiculous injustice of The System - whatever that System might be. That said, in his pieces, there’s always hope for redemption (no matter how fucked up, or unlikely) - may that be true for us all.


Matthew has a number of plays and screenplays in various stages of development and consideration, available upon request. He was a 2018 Nicholl Academy Semi-Finalist and a Julliard Fellowship semi-finalist, a AFF second rounder, and a Newman/ Woodward BPP finalist. He works extensively with the Antaeus Writer’s Lab in LA, as a former panelist and moderator, to develop his, and others’, works. He has ghost written and consulted on several projects he can’t talk about and facilitates writing groups in residential treatment facilities in and around Los Angeles. You can find him online at www.mattdoherty.net

Plays

  • The House Across The Street
    Set at the tail-end of suburban white flight in the 1990s, a middle income mid-American white family must decide to "fly off" to Indiana or not, now that changing racial demographics have caused a steep decline in the value of their home.
  • Brother's Play
    Thomas throws a rock through the rose window at church shattering his family's code of secrets days before Christmas. Melding the profane with the sacred, Brother's Play examines the fragility of masculinity in crisis these days by lampooning the long-term effects of ritualized sex abuse with humor and violence. A nativity play... of sorts.
  • Persuasion
    Libby, an award-winning journalist, undergoes conversion therapy in a dead room till she is convinced that the sky is pink. Meant to sidestep logic in an attempt to give voice to the war on truth and effects of cultural gas-lighting. Menacing clowns and a theater of cruelty / oppression / absurdity delight in the breakdown of meaning inside a digital womb that oversees it all named Enid. It's a mindf--k...
    Libby, an award-winning journalist, undergoes conversion therapy in a dead room till she is convinced that the sky is pink. Meant to sidestep logic in an attempt to give voice to the war on truth and effects of cultural gas-lighting. Menacing clowns and a theater of cruelty / oppression / absurdity delight in the breakdown of meaning inside a digital womb that oversees it all named Enid. It's a mindf--k of a ride. And a f-you to double-speak.

Recommended by Matthew Doherty

  • Polar Bears, Black Boys & Prairie Fringed Orchids
    16 Jul. 2020
    Vincent's eye and ear is tip top and what he points them in concert toward and at is both timely and much needed, without being fleeting or coming across as an easily dismissed "issue-play." He doesn't try and make us comfortable. He is a voice of our theater and our time.