Artistic Statement

Artistic Statement

From a very early age I knew I wanted to be a writer, but back then I had no idea that I would ultimately become a playwright. To be honest, as a young child I never had the opportunity to see live theatre. In fact, I did not even fully comprehend what going to see a play entailed until my high school’s production of West Side Story. In my mind, plays were a thing of the past, something people did in Shakespeare’s day. However, my interest in writing plays sparked after taking a Creative Writing course my freshman year of college.

Of all the genres made accessible to me, I choose to write stage and screenplays because I enjoy observing everyday human interaction in the form of dialogue and translating that onto a page. There is something about people’s various dialects that draw me to them, and a part of me believes it may have to do with the fact that I grew up in a household with a mother who could speak four languages. Being able to witness her speak one language and then instantly switch to another and back to the first or maybe even a third or fourth language, all the while maintaining and implementing facial and body movements that coincide with that corresponding language’s culture always fascinated me. As I began learning new languages myself, I was able to notice firsthand the differences in tone and mannerisms from one vernacular to the next. It is with these distinct memories that I am able to write and develop each of my characters with their unique voice and sense of flavor.

As a female playwright of Haitian descent, I aim to inspire and uplift those who are often marginalized and/or feel unseen by writing and giving life to their stories and my stories as well. My goal is to highlight and showcase to an audience a glimpse into the lives of a few groups, including women, people of color, Christians, and adolescents. I want people to witness that what may make us appear different in gender, color, religious denomination, age, and stature can still unify us all as ONE on stage.

Fighting Forgiveness, Man of the House, and “Final Verdict” are just a few of the plays that exemplify who I am as a dramatist and some of the themes I explore in my writing. The plays Fighting Forgiveness and Man of the House deal with the concept of togetherness, and sometimes separation, within families while exploring the events that unites and/or disconnects them. These plays also encompass the coming of age journey with each of the protagonists trying to break free from the family nest and learning to fly on their own. “Final Verdict” examines race relations, stereotypes, and labeling through the eyes of an interracial couple as they discover their opposing viewpoints on the verdict of a racially charged case. Bringing materials with complex, but very real, themes such as these to the page, stage, or screen is what motivates and compels me to write.