Anna Tatelman

Anna Tatelman

Anna Tatelman is a graduate of the University of New Orleans’s Creative Writing MFA program. Her play Life on the Moon is the the 2017 winner of the Triad Shakes Theatre’s New Play Competition and of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Inkslinger Playwriting Competition. Life on the Moon has been produced at two universities and, prior to the pandemic, was slated to receive its first professional production at...
Anna Tatelman is a graduate of the University of New Orleans’s Creative Writing MFA program. Her play Life on the Moon is the the 2017 winner of the Triad Shakes Theatre’s New Play Competition and of Southeastern Louisiana University’s Inkslinger Playwriting Competition. Life on the Moon has been produced at two universities and, prior to the pandemic, was slated to receive its first professional production at Detroit Repertory Theatre. Anna’s other plays have been produced or are forthcoming at venues such as the Mid-America Theatre Conference, FemuScripts Theatre, The Columbia Theatre for the Performing Arts in Hammond, and Intramural Theatre. Anna’s fiction and non-fiction writings have appeared in numerous publications such as Drunk Monkeys, The Bookends Review’s online magazine and Best of 2017 printed anthology, and The Gallatin Review. Her forthcoming essay “The Edgy Game” was an honorable mention in the 2018 Samuel Mockabee Award for Non-Fiction. When not posing as the female reincarnation of Tennessee Williams, Anna can usually be found overdosing on caffeine, befriending feral cats, and/or eating ice cream.

Plays

  • Life on the Moon
    A young man named Spencer returns home from the military for Christmas. His sister, Piper, who is autistic, is the only person in the family who notices that something is making Spencer unhappy.
  • Attention Must Be Paid
    A non-narrative piece about Arthur Miller, his wife Inge Morath, and their son with Downs Syndrome.
  • Iphigenia Rules GreciPark
    Iphigenia Rules GreciPark is an immersive theatre piece that gives a modern, dystopian twist to Greek mythology. In the original mythology, Iphigenia is a girl who is sacrificed to the gods so that King Agamemnon, her father, can sail away with his army to go win the Trojan War. In this revisioning, Greece has become GreciPark, a nation that typically keeps its citizens peaceful through vicarious forms of...
    Iphigenia Rules GreciPark is an immersive theatre piece that gives a modern, dystopian twist to Greek mythology. In the original mythology, Iphigenia is a girl who is sacrificed to the gods so that King Agamemnon, her father, can sail away with his army to go win the Trojan War. In this revisioning, Greece has become GreciPark, a nation that typically keeps its citizens peaceful through vicarious forms of violence. These citizens, however, have begun to thirst once more for real acts of cruelty and pain, namely in the form of murdering their leader's daughter.
  • More
    A dark comedy in which a zombie has an existential crisis.
  • Love is a Concept Invented by Poor People
    Two people who have connected via online dating meet in person for the first time.
  • Ethical Taxidermy
    A work of theatrical realism that begins with Eileen and Gabriel receiving prenatal test results that say their child will likely have Downs Syndrome. Gabriel wants to keep the child. Eileen doesn’t. This disagreement gradually brings to light not only their personal differences, but what they perceive as their moral differences, too. They argue frequently with one another and their imaginary friends (Helen...
    A work of theatrical realism that begins with Eileen and Gabriel receiving prenatal test results that say their child will likely have Downs Syndrome. Gabriel wants to keep the child. Eileen doesn’t. This disagreement gradually brings to light not only their personal differences, but what they perceive as their moral differences, too. They argue frequently with one another and their imaginary friends (Helen Keller, the renowned disability-rights advocate, and Rose Williams, the sister of Tennessee Williams, respectively).
  • The Resurrection of Belief
    A ten minute play about the waning goddess Styx, the artist keeping her alive, and Jesus Christ's Pyrrhic kindness.
  • The Merchant of Venice: The Musical
    A musical theatre version of Shakespeare's play. This adaptation takes the original's problematic undercurrents -- such as racism, misogyny, homophobia, and classism -- and cracks them wide open.
  • Fire and Brimstone
    A short "guess who's coming to dinner" play in which a mother sets up her adult daughter on a date without consulting her first.