Recommended by Claudia Haas

  • Tiendita San Felipe (Or The Little Store That Could)
    16 Apr. 2018
    This is a most imaginative play built on the nitty-gritty reality of Puerto Rico's vulnerability to hurricanes. (Specifically in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.) Looking to soothe a frightened child, a Storyteller creates a tale of safety in the form of an indestructible building. It has all the elements of a fable: good, evil, magic, and redemption. Told through music, dance, movement and mime, Diaz-Marcano has created a gem that sparkles through his hero and heroine. Young audiences will be at the edge of their seats and their families will delight in its theatricality.
  • Always
    16 Apr. 2018
    A lovely play about a moment in time between a father and daughter that couldn't be more awkward. Bykowski explores their past in one of the more amusing ways possible. She then gives you an ending that makes you hold your breath and wish all good things in the future for the two of them.
  • JUMP
    16 Apr. 2018
    The titanic, mermaids and finally a friend/lover who jumped into the ocean. The play sets you up for the magnitude of the loss with these conversations. You mourn with Froggy and North. With such nuanced characters, you feel their loss intently. There's such honesty and beauty in this script that you become emotionally attached to all three characters.
  • Almost Fairy Time
    16 Apr. 2018
    This is a delightful introduction to the fairies of Shakespeare. With wit and a great deal of silliness, we find four fairies trying to get their time onstage (and you know it's going to work). Burbano offers a clever answer to the old-age question of "Did Shakespeare write Shakespeare?" No, the fairies did. The roles are perfectly suited to young performers and I am betting there will be a few in the audience wanting to go further in discovering who these fairies are. It's enough of a teaser to make young people open the Bard's book.
  • Another Part of the Field
    15 Apr. 2018
    I saw this at the Inge Festival and it packed a whallop. Boyle finds so much life and humanity in the act of dying that it leaves you broken-hearted. The reality of war is front and center. We meet two "enemies" and in the span of ten-minutes we watch them cling to life, crack a joke, try to eat - all life affirmations - before they die. Tragic and poignant, it provides two thoughtful roles for the actors.
  • Man & Wife
    15 Apr. 2018
    Hold on to your hats, it's going to be a bumpy life. And it is. Goldman-Sherman explores role-playing, gender-identity, Trumpism, climate change and even ye olde yearly Merry Christmas card with candor and warmth. Written with a deft ear (and eye) for character nuances, Sherman lays bare a marriage that is the poster child for our times. Her couple radiates their humanity in all its foibles. Sometimes you're nodding your head and then suddenly - you want to clobber them. The two roles are multi-layered and a gift to the actors. It's one crazy, funhouse ride.
  • 800 Miles
    15 Apr. 2018
    Goldman-Sherman deftly captures a marriage being changed. The 800 mile car ride with each other is their future together. Their son has just been dropped off at his college and the empty-nest syndrome has just begun. What is so telling is that what is said is a cover for what is left unsaid. Goldman-Sherman deftly captures this couple's vulnerability and fears as they strive to move forward. It's a beauty of a play about looking at a new chapter in your life. Better yet, it contains two strong roles for mature actors.
  • The Great Divide
    15 Apr. 2018
    Lewis's play focuses on two things: the humanity of all in the great divide that is America today and the necessity of protest to enact change. Told through the lens of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, we are treated to snapshots of birders, ranchers, occupiers and a novice reporter who is trying to make sense of the protest. The Great Divide isn't meant to shock or condemn but to nudge people to engage in meaningful conversations. Conversations that are long overdue. It's currently being workshopped and I think it will be an important play in the years to come.
  • For Unto Us
    14 Apr. 2018
    Kaplan covers a lot of ground in this holiday play. The premise is simple: two children play with a doll. Then it evolves into questions of role play, religion, God, commercialism, all the while keeping the childlike wonder of all their confusions. In the midst of a lot of snappy and clever dialogue, the broad theme of acceptance shines.
  • The True Meaning of Christmas
    14 Apr. 2018
    You have to love a play that has mall employees debating the worthiness of zombie Santa, Mrs. Claus baking brain-cookies for Christmas or Santa raping a reindeer. All are commercially viable and in the news. This play is perfect for all the alternative Christmas festivals popping up for those who have overdosed on candy canes and Hallmark.

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