Recommended by Audrey Lang

  • Puff Puff Pass
    12 Jan. 2021
    I was thrilled to include Puff Puff Pass in the Sunday Salon at Green Gables series that I curated over Zoom. It is a play that is both humorous and touching, and a super fun take for older audiences on a story we all know and love.
  • Antigone, presented by the girls of St. Catherine's
    3 Jan. 2021
    A fantastic ensemble piece for young women that is both beautiful and tragic - just as its source material can be. Each character is a delightfully and intriguingly full person who I could gladly watch for far longer than the length of the play. And along with the brilliant way this play uses Sophocles' Antigone and creates something even bigger, I love that it challenges the notion of "the show must go on" and asks us if that is truly the healthiest mentality to promote.
  • marked green at birth, marked female at birth
    31 Dec. 2020
    I had the pleasure of seeing the Pride Plays reading of Sophie Sagan-Gutherz's magnificent play. It is thoughtful and touching and rings so perfectly true as a play about young people who really do sound and feel authentically young. I wish I'd had "marked green at birth, marked female at birth" in my life when I was a queer middle and high schooler (though I didn't know it yet)!
  • The Siblings Play
    31 Dec. 2020
    I feel so lucky to have seen a couple iterations of The Siblings Play, from a reading at MCC's PlayLabs to the recording of the Rattlestick production from earlier this year. The story it tells is painful, vital, and thought-provoking - and one I want the whole world to see, hear, and experience.
  • Cambodian Rock Band
    31 Dec. 2020
    Cambodian Rock Band was one of the last shows I saw pre-COVID and I am so grateful for it. There is humor along with the devastation of the events the play depicts, and I was cheering at the end (along with the rest of the audience) in a way that I never have at any other show.
  • The Virtuous Fall of the Girls from Our Lady of Sorrows
    21 Dec. 2020
    Some plays leap off the page in a way that reminds you, especially right now, that they are meant to be performed live, on a stage. "The Virtuous Fall of the Girls from Our Lady of Sorrows" is one of those plays. It's an exhilarating, vibrant, heartbreaking, thought-provoking read that makes me yearn to SEE it in the best way. Each character is fully rendered and even those who at first glance might be less deserving of grace are still given it, without letting them off the hook either. A play I will definitely come back to again and again!
  • Jawbone
    30 Nov. 2020
    I was so lucky to take part in The Workshop Theater's Fall 2020 writers' group with Isabella Waldron and witness a step in the development of JAWBONE! From the start, I was so deeply taken with this play and the way it lets three young women be so real and true, while simultaneously making its magical world entirely believable for audience members or readers. JAWBONE tells a painful but engaging story of sexual assault and coming of age as a young woman. I can't wait to see where it goes next!
  • FUKT
    27 Oct. 2020
    FUKT is the kind of play that makes you feel less alone. It's hard to say something that hasn't already been said in its many recommendations, but it feels important to me after reading such an extraordinary piece as this one, to say something. FUKT is a story of honesty and compassion, including with and for yourself, when those things are most difficult to offer. As these three versions of one woman learn how to be less alone together, so do I.
  • Soon, Again, Not Yet
    3 Oct. 2020
    I had the opportunity to see Aaliyah Warrington's incredible play SOON, AGAIN, NOT YET performed via Zoom in the 2020 IC New Play Incubator. This play packs a punch, depicting a Black woman in science and how she struggles with her past, present, and future. Even over Zoom, the power of Warrington's words, story, and well-drawn characters were apparent.
  • Geomancer
    26 Sep. 2020
    "Geomancer" is a thoughtful and thought-provoking look at real people and real events that I know I learned little if anything about in school, with a complex layering of science, politics, history, and emotions. It's the sort of play you want to read again, both to gain new insights and to re-experience the journey that Lum has created.

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