Recommended by Rand Higbee

  • The Trials of Virginia Rappe
    21 Jul. 2021
    "Fatty" Arbuckle was a towering figure in the early days of cinema and his trial(s) for manslaughter shook the industry like nothing had before. In dramatizing these events, Tamar Shai Bolkvadze does not call her play "The Trials of Fatty Arbuckle," but chooses to use the name of the victim instead. A clever decision that speaks volumes, because the play will certainly remind you of the old adage that the more things seem to change, the more they stay the same. I definitely want to see a full production of this.
  • Daphne Becomes the Arctic
    30 Jun. 2021
    Sometimes Greg Romero's plays are a bit of a puzzle. Is this play about a young woman who is stuck in an arctic blizzard? A play about a young woman arguing with her boyfriend? Or maybe it's a play about a polar bear? When all of these elements finally come together and you figure it out, it's one powerful moment. Well done, Greg!
  • Cruicifixin's
    17 Jun. 2021
    Two young people stop at a Creation Museum and get a bite to eat at the Crucifixin's Café. As they marvel at the oddities surrounding them, they get into a discussion about religious beliefs, vegetarianism and the like. Playwright Sean Keeley deftly mixes humor with real world concerns to come up with a play that is both fun and thoughtful.
  • Going in Blind
    16 Jun. 2021
    A young woman, Jesalyn, is trying to put together the jigsaw puzzle of her life by meeting a mysterious person from her past. Tamar Shai Bolkvadze reveals just enough to let you understand just enough. You are left like the young Jesalyn herself: Knowing a few things but yearning to know so much more.
  • Life Raft
    16 Jun. 2021
    Having written a short "Life Raft" type play myself recently, I was curious to read this one by Eric Moore. Two women are on a life raft in the middle of the ocean for their second (or is it the third?) day. They are running out of supplies. What could be worse? How about a sea monster that starts to slam into their boat? Moore does a nice job here of setting up an interesting premise and then taking it to a place you're not expecting.
  • Commencement
    13 Jun. 2021
    "Commencement" (or should it really be entitled "Promotion?") is about two grandmothers coming together to watch their granddaughter graduate from fifth grade. Divorce, however, has turned what should be a happy occasion into one full of awkwardness. On the surface this is a simple play with simple dialogue, but there is a great deal going on just beneath that surface. It's a quick read. Quit reading my recommendation and read this play!
  • The Tragedy of the Election of the Citrus King
    9 Jun. 2021
    I started reading this play expecting (and rather hoping for) a long harangue against Donald Trump. What I found instead was a surprisingly balanced look at both the supporters of the man and those who were horrified at his rise to power. Is this play now irrelevant since the election of Joe Biden? Not at all! These are issues we will be debating for decades to come. Timeless, as the very dialogue itself alludes to. Bravo Deb Victoroff!
  • Cuddle Time
    9 Jun. 2021
    I have read plays about pets. And I have read plays about the end of the world. I don't believe I have read a play before about facing the end of the world with our pets before. That is what Marguerite Scott has done here. A woman and her dog face what could be doomsday together, but neither can quite understand what the other is thinking. They simply know that they need each other.
  • To The Moon!
    2 Jun. 2021
    A short and quick little play about a man who won a free trip to the Moon. The thing is, he's afraid of the Moon. You know how it always follows us around and such? This is a cautionary "Be careful what you wish for tale" from Lisa Dellagiarino Feriend that also happens to be quite funny.
  • The Menu
    7 May. 2021
    I was drawn to this play by the genre description: "Dark comedy, faith-based, fantasy, science fiction..." I'm thinking, really? How can all of those fit into one short play? But after reading the first line I said "Okay. I get it now."

    I don't believe I had ever read anything by playwright Cindi Sansone-Braff, but if this fun, quirky little short is any indication of her style, I will have to read more.

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