Recommended by Toby Malone

  • SEEING EYE
    11 Jun. 2020
    An affecting, intimate, vibrant play about layers of trauma and how we manage to go forward. Jason is a character we want so badly to make a breakthrough, and it's not until late that it's clear that Jason doesn't need our pity, our support, our accommodations: he carries a strength borne from trauma that Robbie struggles to understand. Malakhow's exploration of a simple premise - which could be as simple as 'how do gay men who are blind manage to date' but is more complex than that - is impactful and true. Thanks forthe recommendation, NPX Featured List!
  • Sperm Donor Wanted (or, The Unnamed Baby Play)
    22 May. 2020
    'The Unnamed Baby Play' is a work that in less skilled hands would turn into a kitschy, broad, gag-fest sitcom. Thank God TJ Young is the one taking on the challenge: the story of a lesbian couple attempting to conceive a child with a gay couple they met on Craigslist is one rife with pitfalls and challenges, but Young handles them with aplomb, bringing humanity, charm, and impeccable structural talent to the fore. Layered, complex, heartfelt, but always beautifully real, 'The Unnamed Baby Play' is one you're going to see a lot of in the coming years.
  • Lyon's Den
    21 May. 2020
    How do you find your voice when everything you loved has evaporated before your eyes? 'Lyon's Den' is a heartfelt, passionate meditation on the life of Q, a young African American man on the cusp of greatness unable to properly express the poetry in his soul. Dealing with family tragedy, misplaced anger, and the power of the unspoken, 'Lyon's Den' uses memory, spoken word, and collective grief to explore the path it takes to move forward after the unspeakable.
  • Grenadine
    21 May. 2020
    This remains one of my favorite plays ever: Neil's incredible feel for dialogue, humor, and intellectual engagement make this the kind of work that just isn't seen very much anymore. Heartfelt, hilarious, impactful. This is an absurdist masterpiece that should be read alongside Albee, Pinter, and Beckett.

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