Recommended by David Lee White

  • CHRISTMAS 2.0
    19 Feb. 2019
    A timely and VERY funny play about marriage, loneliness, the holidays and the lure of social media. Hoke creates a believable set of characters and relationships, then provides them with quick, funny dialogue to keep things buoyant. I laughed out loud several times while reading this. The script is family-friendly with just enough "wink, wink, nudge, nudge" moments to keep things from getting overly sentimental. It's clever, it's smart and would make a great alternative to more traditional holiday fare.
  • Badger and Frame
    28 Jan. 2019
    This is a lovely, deeply touching meditation on the legacy of forbidden, adolescent love. It's a simple story, simply told, with characters that have profoundly rich inner lives. Despite the grief inherent in the scenario, the characters make connections with one another that are meaningful and satisfying. The script has the feel of a well-crafted short story. And like all good stories, it hovers between quiet sadness and glimmers of hope. Well worth reading and producing.
  • What's in Store
    6 Dec. 2018
    This is a hilarious, ensemble comedy about the search for family and community. When Jaycee decides to give up on searching for a suitable apartment in favor of moving into a DUKTIG (think IKEA), she inadvertently boosts the store's performance and starts her own communal living project. The tone is somewhere between surrealism and farce (in the best possible way) with solid characters, some nice narrative twists and dozens of drop-dead funny moments. Brennan has an irresistible sense of humor and I highly recommend this piece.
  • Homeowners
    3 Sep. 2018
    I loved this play - an absurdist satire of contemporary American life that dares to turn itself inside out by the end. You may finish reading this feeling bewildered. But don’t give up on it. When the truth of the piece finally dawns on you, you’ll realize what an accomplishment it is and how much it has to say about this moment in time and how we got here.
  • Babel
    7 Aug. 2018
    Babel is a magnificent piece of work. Goldfinger has taken a simple futuristic conceit and used it as a springboard to tackle some of the most difficult cultural issues of our time. What starts out as a play about eugenics, quickly morphs into a play about privilege, political engagement, familial responsibility and individual courage. But it’s a very human story as well. There’s one moment in particular in which a character allows a phone call to go into her voicemail, that feels as dramatically potent as someone unleashing a virus into the water supply. Highly recommended.
  • The Disappearing Act
    14 Jun. 2018
    This is a terrific, poignant, pitch-black comedy. Very surreal and theatrical. By turns funny and horrifying. Well worth a look.
  • The Assassin's Lover - a play with music
    25 May. 2018
    This is a fascinating, ambitious piece about the assassination of Rasputin. Don’t be scared by history - Kilgore is quite adept at balancing facts with human drama. The piece is ready for a good, solid workshop to take it to the next step. Despite the historical setting, it is easily producible, with only four performers and a clever conceit that keeps scenery to a minimum. World history buffs should find this very worthwhile.
  • Enabler
    19 May. 2018
    This is a pitch-perfect, ten minute dark comedy. Brennan has something important to say but she also has a flair for absurdist comedy. What starts out as commentary on the marketing of pharmaceuticals quickly takes a detour and becomes a cautionary tale about the search for a quick fix. The dialogue is fun and snappy. An ensemble of funny actors would have a great time with this.
  • Inbox: Empty or Airport: Scanning
    29 Apr. 2018
    How wonderful to read a play about a man and a woman that isn’t about hooking up or finding a mate, but is simply about making a connection. This play is clever and theatrically savvy, but underneath the fun (and funny) use of technology is a very sweet, very human story.
  • Interviewese
    12 Sep. 2017
    I just had the pleasure of seeing a reading of this hilarious play! If you're looking for a wild, irreverent play for four comedic actresses, check it out. Ian August's wit is second to none and this play has enough absurdism and existential dread to make it more than just light comedy. Amidst all the punchlines, there's a very weighty exploration about the toxic effects of competitive capitalism. Best of all, you may think you've got things figured out after the first thirty minutes, but August saves some of his best surprises for the end.

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